MEMORANDUM FOR: President, Bull Run Civil War Round Table

SUBJECT: 

In accordance with the BRCWRT By-Laws, the following constitutes the listing and summary status of Civil era sites, buildings and/or memorials in our geographic area that are in need of protection, preservation, or restoration and will be the primary focus for BRCWRT preservation actions and activities during 2020. This list and its contents, which are not presented in order of priority, will be updated on a quarterly basis.

(See BRCWT 2017 thru 2019 Preservation Focus and Quarterly Updates for previous summaries and histories of listed actions and activities)

2020 Preservation Actions & Activities

Route 28 Transportation Study & Project (Blackburn’s Ford Battlefield)

www.route28study.com.
Background. The Northern Virginia
Transportation Authority (NVTA)’s Route 28 Transportation Study and Project is focused on infrastructure projects that will improve travel times and network reliability on Route 28 through Prince William County, the City of Manassas and the City of Manassas Park.

Fairfax County has approved plans to widen Route 28 from north of the Fairfax County/Prince William County border to US Route 29 to three lanes in each direction and make improvements to existing intersections (this project is scheduled for completion in 2023). Prince William County is widening Route 28 to a six-lane divided facility between Linton Hall Road and Pennsylvania Avenue. The City of Manassas is widening Route 28 to six lanes between Pennsylvania Avenue and Godwin Drive through the Prince William County Parkway (Rte. 234)/Route 28 interchange. These projects collectively will leave a section of Route 28 between Godwin Drive and Bull Run unimproved, with recurring daily congestion this is the section of Route 28 that is the focus of the Route 28 Transportation Study and Project.

The Route 28 Corridor Feasibility Study was the first step in a four-step project development process envisioned to culminate with project construction completed by 2024.
Step1: Feasibility Study
Identification of Highest Ranked Alternative
Step 2: Complete National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process (18-24 months; 2018 - 2019)
Selection of Preferred Alternative
Step 3: Final Design of the Preferred Alternative (36-42 months; 2020 -2021)
Step 4: Construction (48-60 months; 2022-2023)

The Feasibility Study considered four alternatives for technical valuation: 1

February 28, 2020


Alternative 2A: Godwin Drive extended to existing Route 28 south of Bull Run Alternative 2B: Godwin Drive extended to existing Route 28 north of Bull Run Alternative 4: Widening Route 28 on existing alignment between Liberia Avenue and the Fairfax County Line

Alternative 9: Euclid Avenue extension north to Route 28 near Bull Run and south to the Sudley Road/Route 234 intersection

These four alternatives were evaluated using the following criteria project cost (estimated/planning level costs), project benefits, environmental impacts (initial assessment), and socio-economic / right of way impacts. Alternative 2B emerged as the highest ranked alternative (feasibility study result/product).

Threatened Sites: Bull Run Regional Park, Blackburn’s Ford Battlefield, 1st Manassas (Bull Run) Battlefield

2


BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Minimize (preferably eliminate) impacts on Bull Run Regional Park; specifically

    impacts on historical and cultural sites, and on Bull Run Occoquan Trail (BROT) and

    access points

  • Ensure no impacts on Blackburn’s Ford Battlefield, including existing earthwork

    fortifications

  • Ensure no impacts on 1st Manassas (Bull run) Battlefield

    Status Summary:
    Prince William County Department of Transportation in partnership with the Virginia Department of Transportation initiated and environmental assessment study under the provisions of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) in the spring of 2018, with Parsons selected as the consultant to conduct the study. Options from the Feasibility Study under consideration are 2A, 2B and 4 (Option 9 was deemed to be not technically feasible).

    PWC DOT conducted Environmental Assessment Public Meeting #1 on 5 December (PWC) and 6 December (Fairfax County) 2018 at which an Environmental Assessment timeline was presented:

    o Scoping and Data Collection (ongoing)

    o Final Decision on Environmental Assessment by FHWA Winter 2019

    At the Prince William County Department of Transportation Technical Committee meeting conducted September 19, 2019 Parsons provided an update on the Route 28 Corridor Environmental Assessment (EA). Key points from the presentation:

  • Result of EA will be either a Finding of No Significant Impacts (FONSI), or a determination that an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is necessary

  • Cultural Resources Section 106 consultation initiated with Virginia DHR o Phase I Architectural Survey (by Dovetail Cultural Resources Group)

    identified 102 above ground resources that will be 50 years old by 2024) within the APE

    Four (4) post WWII era neighborhoods recommended as not eligible for National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) Ninety-three (93) other individual buildings - recommended as not eligible for HRHP

    Mitchells Ford Entrenchments, previously listed in NRHP in 1989

    retain sufficient integrity should remain listed on NRHP
    o Civil War Battlefields Assessment (by Dovetail Cultural Resources Group)

    identified four battlefields within the APE. (Based on the battlefield Study Areas described in the American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP) July

o Army COE permit required for alternatives impacting streams, wetlands, etc. - coordination with Army Corps of Engineers is ongoing, expect decision regarding COE permitting by March 2019

o Alternatives Refinement / Public Information Meeting Spring 2019 o Environmental Assessment Public Hearing Fall 2019

3


2009 report, and the potential National Register (PotNR) boundaries developed by the ABPP)

Blackburn’s Ford Battlefield areas within the APE - assumed to be eligible for NRHP and will be treated as historic property, with the exclusion of several areas that have lost integrity due to disturbance and development.

  • Existing VDOT right of way for Old Centreville Road/Ordway Road crossing of Bull Run

  • Existing VDOT right of way for Route 28

  • Commercial areas located on either side of Route 28 north of

    Orchard Bridge Drive

  • Townhomes on Charnwood Court

  • Approximately 24 acres of Orchard Bridge development

    First Manassas (Bull Run) Battlefield areas within the APE - assumed to be eligible for NRHP and will be treated as historic property, with the exclusion of several areas that have lost integrity due to disturbance and development.

Same as above

  • Survey of waters and use of wetlands - PE includes suitable habitat for a three

    threatened or endangered species; additional surveys and assessments are

    underway to determine any occurrences

  • Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act of 1966 (prohibits the use of

    federal highway funds for projects that adversely impact publicly owned parks and historic sites unless there is no feasible alternative to the use of such land)

    o Applicability to be determined based on funding for corridor improvements (PWC $200 million transportation bond initiative on ballot for November 5, 2019 election)

  • Refinement of Alternatives
    o Alternative 2A alignment shifted south to avoid Blackburn’s Ford

    Entrenchments and Bull Run Regional Park and to minimize impact to wetlands area

    Residential areas directly impacted

    • Charnwood Court townhome complex

    • Neighborhood playground on north side of Somersworth Drive

o Alternative 2B alignment shifted to overlap with the existing right-of-way along Ordway Road (Old Centreville Road), cross Bull Run at existing bridge and connect to Rt 28 north of Bull Run, minimizing impacts on Bull Run Regional Park and the Blackburn’s Ford and First Manassas (Bull Run) Battlefields

On October 9, 2019 (6:30 pm) PWC hosted a Public Meeting that provided an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Alternatives. During this meeting Parsons and PWC DoT provided an EA update similar to the update provided at the September 19, 2019 Technical Committee meeting, and Supervisor Nohe and PWC DoT Planner Belita provided updates from the County’s perspective and answered attendee questions. Most questions

4


were from home and business owners along the alternatives under consideration, and involved concerns such as drainage, flooding, increased traffic through residential neighborhoods, and impacts on businesses along Rt 28. As design work had not yet begun, answers could not be provided but concerns were recorded so they could be addressed in follow-on planning.

Parties Involved.
NVTA
Manassas Park (Yorkshire District)
City of Manassas
Prince William County Historical Commission NOVA Parks
ABT (CWT)
BRCWRT

Completed Actions.

  • PWC DOT conducted Environmental Assessment Public Meeting #1 on 5 December (PWC) and 6 December (Fairfax County) 2018, and solicited public comments due no later than Jan 10, 2019

  • BRCWRT Comments submitted December 25, 2018 (info@route28study.com)

o In recognition of the existing historical and cultural resources, waterways and wetlands that exist in the Route 28 corridor, recommend the following be added at the end of the goal statement, “........., without negatively affecting historical, cultural and archaeological resources and sites and/or wetlands in the project area.”

o Alternative 2B would significantly threaten the historic character of the Bull Run Regional Park and would significantly degrade the integrity of the quality of the visitor experience, as well as the area’s scenic and historic viewshed. Moreover, by crossing Bull Run Regional Park, Alternative 2B threatens prehistoric and historic archaeological resources that may be present in the path of this proposed alternative.

o Alternative 2B would have a significant negative impact on significant acreage within Bull Run Regional Park associated with the Battle of Blackburn’s Ford and the Battle of First Manassas/Bull Run. The Battle of Blackburn’s Ford, fought on June 18, 1861 and one of the first notable engagements of the Civil War with 151 estimated casualties, preceded the first major land battle of the Civil War, the Battle of First Manassas/Bull Run

fought on July 21, 1861. The acreage through which the northern part of Alternative 2B would cut is located well within the “core” battlefield boundary of both battles as determined by the federal Civil War Sites Advisory Commission (CWSAC) and its Report on the Nation’s Civil War Battlefields.

o Alternative 2A would have a significant negative impact on the Battle of Blackburn’s Ford core battlefield area, and specifically the extant confederate

5


earthworks located north of and overlooking Bull Run on the northern edge

of the core battlefield boundary.
o Any changes to the existing Route 28 bridge crossing over Bull Run Creek

could negatively impact the existing vehicular access from southbound Route 28 to the small parking area and the Bull Run Occoquan Trail, Blackburn’s Ford and the Civil War Trails signs. The 19-mile Bull Run Occoquan Trail has only five vehicular access points, and this is the only one in this vicinity

o Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act of 1966 prohibits the use of federal highway funds for projects that adversely impact publicly

owned parks and historic sites unless there is no feasible alternative to the use of such land. Insofar as the Route 28 Corridor Feasibility Study presented a number of feasible options, it would seem that this statutory criteria cannot be satisfied.

o For all of the reasons noted above, the Bull Run Civil War Round Table strongly recommends Alternative 4 as the preferred option among the three alternatives (2A, 2B, 4) currently under consideration.

BRCWRT representative (Blake Myers) attended September 19, 2019 PWC DoT Technical Committee Meeting where Parson Transportation Group, Inc. presented an Environmental Assessment Update.

o Received, as designated consulting party, copy of two reports completed as part of Section 106 consultation process with Virginia DHR, Phase I Architectural Survey, and Assessment of Battlefields (Dovetail Cultural Resources Group) reviewed reports and determined no discrepancies or issues with report contents

BRCWRT representatives (Blake Myers, Kim Brace) attended October 9, 2019 Public

Meeting hosted by PWC DoT at Yorkshire Elementary School during which DoT and Parsons provided an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Alternatives Update.

Planned Actions/Activities. BRCWRT

o Submit, as appropriate, a request for Consulting Party status in coordination with PWC DOT & Parsons

o Maintain communications and coordinate actions with NOVA Parks (Paul Gilbert, Director, and Michael DePue, Land Manager)

o Continue to attend relevant PWC DOT and public meetings, and submit, as appropriate, BRCWRT comments and information as input into the Route 28 Project

6


Ox Hill Battlefield Park (Battlefield Monuments), Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA)

Background. The long-awaited installation of the Union and Confederate soldiers’ monuments (Ox Hill and Chantilly) at Ox Hill Battlefield Park, and the previously announced dedication ceremony scheduled for September 9, 2017 were “postponed indefinitely” by Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA) officials on July 11, 2017.

Threatened Site: Ox Hill (Chantilly) Battlefield

BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Install the Ox Hill and Chantilly monuments in accordance with the Ox Hill

    Battlefield Park General Management Plan and Conceptual Development Plan that

    was approved in January 2005

  • Adequate maintenance, sustainment and upgrade/replacement (as needed) of the

    Ox Hill Battlefield Park infrastructure

  • Ox Battlefield Park marketed and promoted by Fairfax County as a County historical

    tourism destination

    Status Summary:
    Two plus years of BRCWRT ‘s efforts to work collaboratively with the FCPA and Park Authority Board to install these monuments have been unsuccessful and extremely frustrating.

    BRCWRT representatives attended the following FCPA meetings to monitor Park Authority Board discussions and actions regarding the monuments, and to speak during the public comment segments of Board meetings.

o October 10, 2018 FCPA Committee of the Whole (COW) meeting
o December 12, 2018 COW meeting and the follow on Park Authority Board meeting,

speaking during the meeting’s public comment segment
o January 9, 2019 COW meeting and the follow on Park Authority Board meeting,

speaking during the meeting’s public comment segment
o January 23, 2019 Park Authority Board meeting, speaking during the meeting’s

public comment segment

During the January 23, 2019 Park Authority Board meeting, the Board voted to approve the recommendation of the Executive Director:

The Park Authority Executive Director recommends to not install the monuments in their current form; and recommends that the Park Authority Board establish a subcommittee to work on the disposition of the monuments, as discussed by the Committee of the Whole on January 9, 2019.

No other action was taken by FCPA or the Park Authority Board during 2019.

7


On November 13, 2019 Blake Myers and Ed Wenzel attended the Park Authority Board meeting, and Blake spoke during the public comment segment of the meeting. Blake’s remarks addressed the fact that Chairman Bouie and the Board had not acknowledged receipt of BRCWRT’s letter of July 30, 2019, nor he follow-up email of October 8, 2019, nor had responded to any of our requests. The remarks concluded as follows:

We again request; 1) acknowledgement of receipt of our July 30, 2019 letter and 2) a response to our request that the Board: a) clearly identify the specific wording and/or inscriptions on the monuments that it deems inappropriate, and b) establish the subcommittee to resolve the specific wording and/or inscriptions deemed to be inappropriate and to complete the disposition (installation) of the monuments. We would appreciate a response tonight.

If the Park Authority Board does not intend to take any further action regarding the monuments or the subcommittee, we ask that you state that intent - - in which case, we will no longer bother you with this issue, but will pursue it via other options.

At the conclusion of his remarks, Blake asked Chairman Bouie if the Board intended any action. Chairman Bouie responded that they did and promised to ‘get back’ to us.

On January 15, 2020 BRCWRT members (Mark Trbovich, Blake Myers, Ed Wenzel) received via e-mail, a letter from Park Authority Board Chairman William G. (Bill) Bouie acknowledging receipt of BRCWRT’s letter dated July 31, 2019, indicating his anticipation “that the sub-committee will meet and begin discussions on next steps related to the memorials/monuments in the early half of 2020”, and a reminder of the One Fairfax Policy ‘lens’ through which “the sub-committee will be asked to review and make recommendations for next steps regarding the memorials/monuments.”

BRCWRT President Mark Whitenton responded to Mr. Bouie on January 27, 2020; acknowledging receipt of his letter of January 15, 2020 in response to our July 31, 2019 letter regarding the Ox Hill Battlefield Park monuments. The response:

  • Noted BRCWRT’s encouragement by Mr. Bouie’s anticipation of the subcommittee meetings and discussions and our desire to participate in those meetings and discussions

  • Expressed BRCWRT ‘s interest in the specific charter/scope-of-work of the subcommittee and the appointment of the community members to serve on the subcommittee and requested to be kept informed on both matters

  • Urged Mr. Bouie to appoint Ed Wenzel and Blake Myers to serve on the subcommittee, consistent with Mr. Bouie’s discussions with both gentlemen on January 9, 2019.

    As a result of the continuing frustration experienced in attempting to work with the FCPA and Park Authority Board on this issue BRCWRT sent letters, signed by BRCWRT President Mark Whitenton, to each member of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors on January 21, 2020. The letters included the following;

8


The BRCWRT requests your support to correct the improper actions of the Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA) and the Park Authority Board (hereafter Board) regarding their failure to complete the approved Ox Hill Battlefield Park General Management Plan and Conceptual Development Plan. That Plan, approved by the Board in January 2005, includes two monuments, Chantilly and Ox Hill. These monuments were designed as integral components of the Park and to commemorate the soldiers who fought at Ox Hill. Produced in 2016 at Fairfax County expense, the monuments have yet to be installed as called for in the approved Plan and remain in storage at an undisclosed location. The Chantilly and Ox Hill monuments are typical of monuments located in battlefield parks throughout the United States, are balanced and historically accurate, and complement the existing Park monuments commemorating Union Generals Kearny and Stevens, both of whom were killed during the battle.

Following more than two years of BRCWRT efforts to work collaboratively with FCPA, the Board voted (with one abstention) during their January 23, 2019 meeting to approve the Executive Director’s recommendation, to wit “The Park Authority Executive Director recommends to not install the monuments in their current form; and recommends that the Park Authority Board establish a subcommittee to work on the disposition of the monuments, as discussed by the Committee of the Whole on January 9, 2019.”

During the two-plus year period preceding the Board’s January 23, 2019 vote the FCPA and the Board publicly stated their intent to work with BRCWRT to identify and resolve issues regarding the monuments, but did not follow through on their commitment to do so and have misled the BRCWRT with respect to their intentions and actions. Additionally, to date the FCPA and the Board have neither fully established nor convened the subcommittee called for in the Board’s January 23, 2019 vote, and have not responded to multiple BRCWRT inquiries and offers of assistance.

We request that the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors direct the Park Authority Board to: 1) clearly identify the specific wording and/or inscriptions on the monuments that it deems inappropriate; 2) fully establish and convene the subcommittee to resolve the specific wording and/or inscriptions deemed inappropriate; 3) complete the disposition (installation) of the monuments in accordance with the Ox Hill Battlefield Park General Management Plan and Conceptual Development Plan that was approved in January 2005.

Parties Involved.
FCPA
BRCWRT
Kearny-Stevens Monuments Trustees

Completed Actions.
July 30, 2019 letter from BRCWRT and Kearny-Stevens Monuments Trustees to

William G. Bouie, Chair Park Authority Board (cc - Park Authority Board members, Fairfax County Supervisors, FCPA Executive Director, Chairman Fairfax County History Commission), BRCWRT respectfully requested “that the Board: 1) clearly identify the specific wording and/or inscriptions on the monuments that it deems inappropriate, and 2) establish the subcommittee to resolve the specific wording

9


and/or inscriptions deemed to be inappropriate and to complete the disposition

(installation) of the monuments.”

  • October 8, 2019 email to Park Authority Chairman William Bouie, BRCWRT

    requested 1) acknowledgement of receipt of this email, 2) acknowledgement of receipt of our July 30, 2019 letter and 3) a response to our initial request that the Board: a) clearly identify the specific wording and/or inscriptions on the monuments that it deems inappropriate, and b) establish the subcommittee to resolve the specific wording and/or inscriptions deemed to be inappropriate and to complete the disposition (installation) of the monuments. As of October 18, 2019 BRCWRT has received no response from Chairman Bouie.

  • November 13, 2019 Blake Myers and Ed Wenzel attended the Park Authority Board meeting, and Blake spoke during the public comment segment of the meeting. Blake’s remarks addressed the fact that Chairman Bouie and the Board had not acknowledged receipt of our letter of July 30, 2019, nor our follow-up email of October 8, 2019, nor had responded to our requests. At the conclusion of his remarks, Blake asked Chairman Bouie if the Board intended any action. Chairman Bouie responded that they did and promised to ‘get back’ to us.

  • The continuing frustration with the FCPA and Park Authority Board on this matter led BRCWRT to request intervention by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors. In identical, individual letters mailed on January 21, 2020 to each District Supervisor and to the Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, BRCRT requested the following; “We request that the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors direct the Park Authority Board to: 1) clearly identify the specific wording and/or inscriptions on the monuments that it deems inappropriate; 2) fully establish and convene the subcommittee to resolve the specific wording and/or inscriptions deemed inappropriate; 3) complete the disposition (installation) of the monuments in accordance with the Ox Hill Battlefield Park General Management Plan and Conceptual Development Plan that was approved in January 2005.

  • On January 15, 2020 BRCWRT members Mark Trbovich, Blake Myers and Ed Wenzel received via e-mail, a letter from Park Authority Board Chairman William G. (Bill) Bouie acknowledging receipt of BRCWRT’s letter dated July 31, 2019, indicating his anticipation “that the sub-committee will meet and begin discussions on next steps related to the memorials/monuments in the early half of 2020”, and a reminder of the One Fairfax Policy ‘lens’ through which “the sub-committee will be asked to review and make recommendations for next steps regarding the memorials/monuments.”

  • BRCWRT President Mark Whitenton responded to Mr. Bouie on January 24, 2020; acknowledging receipt of his letter of January 15, 2020 in response to our July 31, 2019 letter regarding the Ox Hill Battlefield Park monuments. This letter noted BRCWRT’s encouragement by Mr. Bouie’s anticipation of the subcommittee meetings and discussions and our desire to participate in those meetings and discussions. The letter expressed BRCWRT ‘s interest in the specific charter/scope- of-work of the subcommittee and the appointment of the community members to serve on the subcommittee and requested to be kept informed on both matters. The letter also urged Mr. Bouie to appoint Ed Wenzel and Blake Myers to serve on the

10


subcommittee, consistent with Mr. Bouie’s discussions with both gentlemen on January 9, 2019.

Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Maintain communication with FCPA Executive Director

  • Continue to monitor subcommittee formation, activities, and participate as

    members (once appointed)

  • Provide appropriate representation on the subcommittee

  • Follow up with selected Fairfax County Supervisors to schedule office visits and

    discussion

  • Work in collaboration with other like-minded groups and the FCHC to bring focus to

    Ox Hill Battlefield Park as an historic site, a place of learning and an attraction for

    tourists and tourism dollars.

  • Collaborate with the Kearney-Stevens Monuments Trustees in stressing to FCPA the

    need to properly maintain Ox Hill Battlefield Park current issues include overgrown brush, deteriorated fence rails and fence lines (appear to be the same ones initially installed in 2008), kiosk and marker maintenance (rust, dirt), etc.

    Farr’s Fort (Redoubt on GMU Fairfax Campus)

    Background. Local historians have long known of the significance of the area surrounding the Ox Road (Route 123)/Braddock Road (Route 620) intersection (Farr’s Cross Roads). Several studies, including the Fairfax County Civil War Sites Inventory (prepared by John Milner Associates, Inc. in 2002), have documented the existence of Civil War-era redoubts, earthworks and camps in the areas surrounding the intersection.

    Of particular interest is a redoubt and set of earthworks constructed by Col. Robert Rodes’ 5th Alabama (Ewell’s Brigade) in July 1861, prior to Battle of 1st Manassas/Bull Run, located on George Mason University (GMU), Fairfax Campus. The site is in a small wooded area on the northeast quadrant of the Ox Road/Braddock Road intersection.

    The site is documented in the Fairfax County Civil War Sites Inventory completed by John Milner Associates, Inc. for the Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA) in 2002, and is included (44FX185) in the Fairfax County and Virginia historic site databases. Brian Corle, while a student at George Mason University (GMU), completed the Archeological Assessment of Site 44FX185, The Earthwork at Farrs Crossroads Fairfax County, Virginia (DHR File Number 2008-1541) in 2008.

    In 2014 and 2016, remnants of the corduroy road that ran between Fairfax Court House and Fairfax Station were discovered during road construction projects along the section of Ox Road bordering the University Mall. BRCWRT supported the Friends of the Historic Courthouse in discussions to establish a site with appropriate signage describing the history and location of the Corduroy Road (Ox Road) - potential site locations included

11


University Mall and GMU (as part of redoubt site). An initial dendrochronology assessment of logs recovered from the excavated corduroy road site indicated that the logs did not have a sufficient number of growth rings to accurately date them. While the inability to accurately date these recovered logs is unfortunate, they still present a terrific opportunity to tell and depict the history and story of the corduroying of Ox Road (before, during and after the Civil War period). There has been no progress to date on the Corduroy Road initiative.

Threatened Sites: Farr’s Crossroads, Civil War fortification (Farr’s Fort) constructed in 1861 by Confederate forces and used by both Confederate and Federal forces throughout the war.

BRCWRT Objectives:
Preserve and interpret the Farr’s Cross Roads Site, including:

o Farr’sFortRedoubt
o Farr’s Cross Roads History o CorduroyRoad

Develop and implement a site treatment plan

Status Summary:
In 2016 BRCWRT began discussions with GMU’s Department of History and Art History about Farr’s Crossroads and its history and relevance to local, state and national history. This discussion led to BRCWRT members conducting, beginning in the Fall of 2016, an annual on-site class/tour for the Department’s Civil War and Reconstruction course students on the history of the site and Farr’s Fort redoubt. The success of these classes and the attendant interest generated within the GMU scholastic community led to discussions concerning preserving and interpreting the site.

In 2018 a collaborative effort involving BRCWRT, GMU’s Department of History and Art History and Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science (GGS), and professional archaeologists produced a preliminary preservation and interpretive plan and concept for the site. The concept was presented to a select group of GMU administrative staff leaders on September 14, 2018. These leaders understood the historical significance of the redoubt and Farr’s Cross Roads, and expressed interest in pursuing the concept of preserving and interpreting the site. No definitive decisions were reached but follow up actions to mature the concept and conduct further discussions were identified, among them the removal of four trees threatening redoubt structural integrity, and to verify/document the historical significance of Farr’s Fort.

In October 2018, we initiated the process for submission of Farr’s Fort for inclusion on the Virginia Landmarks Register, and potentially the NPS National Register of Historic Places. The Farr’s Fort registration information packet was completed based on historical research conducted by BRCWRT members Brain McEnany, Jim Lewis and Blake Myers, and information in The Archaeological Assessment of Site 44FX0185 The Earthworks at Farr’s Crossroads Fairfax County, Virginia completed by Brian Corle in 2008. The packet was completed and submitted to DHR’s Northern Regional Preservation Office in Stevens City

12


on January 25, 2019. The Virginia State Review Board determined that the site is potentially eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion C, Military History on March 21, 2019. The next step, under discussion with GMU, is completion of the National Register of Historic Places application.

On June,5, 2019 Dr. Brian Platt, Chair of the Department of History and Art History, and Blake Myers, BRCWRT, met with Carol Kissal, Senior VP for Administration and Finance and Frank Strike, VP Facilities to discuss the Farr’s Fort site and the potential to preserve and interpret the site. Carol Kissall made the decision that GMU would preserve and interpret the site under the purview of Frank Strike, VP Facilities, with two components to the project:

  • A near-term component to preserve and interpret Farr’s Fort

  • A long -term component to include the broad historical aspects of the Farr’s Cross

    roads and Farr’s Fort site in the development of the Mason Master Plan, scheduled to begin in 2019/2020

    On June 25, 2019 the core preservation team (Dr. Brian Platt, Erich Miller, Chris Sperling, Blake Myers, Jim Lewis and Brian McEnany) conducted a site visit, followed by a review and discussion of the Initial Draft Treatment Plan to guide the preservation and interpretation of the site. Based n this discussion the Plan was updated and revised on June 27, 2019

    On September 24, 2019 Dr. Bran Platt and Blake Myers met with Frank Strike, VP Facilities, and Doug Lipscomb, Assistant VP Campus Planning, to discuss implementation of the Draft Farr’s Fort Treatment Plan. Doug informed us that he had discussed the site and treatment plan with Adrienne Birge-Wilson at Virginia DHR, and DHR strongly recommended that a site archaeological assessment be done prior to any site disturbance, including preservation or interpretation project work. As GMU has no archaeological department, Doug’s recommendation was to add a site archaeological assessment to the cultural resources assessment planned as part of the development of the Mason Master Plan, due to begin this Fall (2019).

    On November 18, 2019 Blake Myers received an email from Doug Lipscomb, GMU Assistant Vice President Planning and Design, with the following information, “Due to other causes as of last week we are currently not proceeding with the parking lot project which would have funded the archaeological assessment. Therefore, we have no source to fund the archaeological assessment at this time. Depending upon funding level we may incorporate this effort into our Master Plan which we will be initiating in the relative near term.” Follow up information provided by Doug Lipscomb on Nov 19, 2019 included treh following: As per the Virginia Department of Historic Resources we are directed not to proceed with any modifications, improvements, etc. associated with the Fort Farr area until we have completed an archaeological assessment.......The parking study and associated archaeological assessment is not proceeding at this time. It is possible if funding allows that this will be incorporated into the Master Plan - the scope of which I am currently negotiating with a consultant. I have no other information at this time on the subject.

13


Communications from November 2019 through February 2020 between BRCWRT, Virginia DHR and GMU brought to light some confusion and misinterpretation of information, guidance and recommendations DHR had provided to GMU.

On February 20, 2020 a teleconference was conducted to discuss preserving and interpreting Farr’s Fort and the Farr’s Crossroads Site. Teleconference participants were; Frank Strike (VP Facilities), Deniz Callahan, (Campus Planning Staff) Dr. Brain Platt (Chair, Department of History and Art History), Blake Myers (BRCWRT), Adrienne Birge-Wilson (Va. DHR), Roger Kirchen (Va. DHR), and Jennifer Bellville-Marrion (Va. DHR). The objective of the teleconference was to get all the key players (GMU, DHR, BRCWRT) in one place to discuss the relevant issues and concerns, share information and get us all on the same page, and determine a way forward - all of which was accomplished.

Frank Strike informed participants that the 21-month Mason Master Plan development process was initiated in January 2020. The process consists of two phases; Phase I (ongoing) is assessment, data collection and analysis, and Phase II will consist of developing infrastructure plans addressing archaeological/cultural assessments, staff needs, student needs and facilities. GMU, while supportive of the preserving and interpreting the site, discussed issues of concern from GMU's perspective - determining specific preservation and interpretation actions that can potentially be done, identifying & accounting for any relevant restrictions (e.g., ADA accessibility), and identifying the ultimate resources (cost, people/expertise, etc.) required for the project.

The teleconference resulted in an agreed upon way forward for the near-term preservation component that includes; 1) conducting an initial assessment of possible preservation and interpretation actions, 2) clarifying any specific restrictions related to ADA accessibility, etc. and 3) once we have information based on these two actions, re-convene to discuss and determine the next steps. Actions currently planned and/or on-going include; 1) a broad archaeological site assessment to clarify possible preservation and interpretation options, 2) an onsite visit/assessment by DHR representatives, 3) assessing specific ADA accessibility requirements and 4) a follow on meeting/teleconference to review information and revise/update plans, as appropriate.

Discussions with Adrienne Birge-Wilson (V. DHR) on February 26, 2020 confirmed a Farr’s Fort site visit by Adrienne and Jennifer Bellville-Marrion on Wednesday March 12, 2020. Dr.Platt, Blake Myers and Chris Sperling (FCPA Archaeologist) to meet & accompany Adrienne and Jennifer on site visit.

BRCWRT is continuing its support of GMU’s Department of History and Art History by providing an annual Farr’s Crossroads / Farr’s Fort on-site class for students in Professor Christopher’s Hamner’s HIST 373 Civil War and Reconstruction class. This on-site class, planned and conducted by BRCWRT members Brian McEnany, Jim Lewis and Blake Myers, began in 2016 and is typically conducted in the fall of each year.

Parties Involved.
GMU Department of History and Art History

14


GMU Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science (GGS) GMU Facilities Department
GMU Grounds Department
BRCWRT

Fairfax County Park Authority Virginia DHR

Completed Actions.
BRCWRT Classes/Tours of Farr’s Cross Roads Redoubt

• •

7 November 2016 - Brian McEnany, Jim Lewis and Blake Myers conducted Farr’s Cross Roads Site tour and class for Professor Christopher Hamner’s Civil War and Reconstruction class (attendees - fourteen students, Brian Platt, Christopher Hamner).

30 October 2017 - Brian McEnany, Jim Lewis and Blake Myers conducted Farr’s Cross Roads Site tour and class for Professor Christopher Hamner’s Civil War and Reconstruction class (attendees - twenty-four students, Alex Hughes [2016 BRCWRT Scholarship Awardee & current GMU student], Brian Platt, Christopher Hamner, and Ann Reynolds & Laura Powers from the Dean’s Office of Communications).

23 October 2018 Brian McEnany, Jim Lewis and Blake Myers conducted Farr’s Cross Roads Site tour and class for Professor Christopher Hamner’s Civil War and Reconstruction class (attendees included twenty-three GMU students, History Department Chair Brian Platt, Professor Christopher Hamner, and fifteen BRCWRT members).

Treatment Plan Development

  • BRWCRT research; October December 2017

  • January 10, 2018 meeting with Brain Platt, Chair of GMU History Department to

    discuss research findings, preservation guidelines, preservation team requirements and resources, applicable state requirements and policies, funding sources, etc. and plan to move forward with presentation to appropriate GMU decision makers

  • Preservation ‘core team’ preliminary assessment conducted March 2, 2018 o Core Team members:

    Team Leader: Dr. Brain Platt, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of History and Art History
    Archaeologist: Joe Balicki, Commonwealth Heritage Group, Partner & Senior Archaeologist; Christopher Sperling, FCPA Senior Archaeologist & GMU graduate (advisory role)

    Arborist: Randall Teets, GMU Grounds Shop
    Site Preparation, Stabilization & Maintenance: Archie Nesbitt, GMU Grounds Shop Supervisor
    BRCWRT - Research and historical documentation, Liaison with FCPA and Virginia DHR, Interpretive signs text and contents: Blake Myers, Brian McEnany, Jim Lewis

    o Developed preliminary treatment plan concept 15


Site stabilization, access and ‘debris clearance’

Site interpretation
o Preliminary Treatment Plan and Assessment completed on March 15, 2018

Preliminary cost estimate - $23,440.00
o Initial Draft Treatment Plan completed on June 27, 2019

Farr’s Fort inclusion in Virginia Landmarks Register, and potentially National Park Service National Register of Historic Places

  • Farr’s Fort information packet signed by GMU Senior Vice President Tom Calhoun on January 14, 2019

  • Farr’s Fort information packet submitted to Virginia DHR’s Northern Regional Preservation Office on January 25, 2019

  • The Virginia State Review Board determined that the site is potentially eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion C, Military History on March 21, 2019. The next step, under discussion with GMU, is completion of the National Register of Historic Places application.

    Planned Actions/Activities.

Continue coordination with GMU regarding incorporation of Farr’s Cross Roads and

Farr’s Fort historic site in development of the Mason Master Plan (2020)
o Archeological Assessment as part of Mason Master Plan development
o Fully develop site Treatment Plan to include specific actions necessary to

preserve and interpret the earthwork (tbd) o Obtain approval of Treatment Plan (tbd)
o Implement Treatment Plan (tbd)

Continue coordination with GMU regarding near-term preservation and interpretation project

o Mulched access path
o Interpretive marker at path entrance (Parking Lot K) o CWT marker at redoubt (Farr’s Fort)

Follow up actions from February 20, 2020 teleconference (GMU, BRCWRT, DHR) o Coordination with Chris Sperling and Joe Balicki (Blake)
o Follow up with Ruth Townsend re ADA Accessibility issue/questions (Dr.

Platt)
o Conduct site broad assessment (Chris and/or Joe)
o Conduct follow-up meeting to consider results of above actions o Revise/Update Plan/Way Forward as appropriate

  • Farr’s Fort Site visit on March 12, 2020 with Virginia DHR representatives Adrienne Birge-Wilson and Jennifer Bellville-Marrion, Dr.Platt, Chris Sperling and Blake Myers

  • Discussion and coordination with GMU regarding completion and submittal of a National Register of Historic Places application for Farr’s Fort

  • Continue to support GMU’s Department of History and Art History with an annual class/tour of the Farr’s Cross Roads site

16


Signal [Willcoxon] Hill

Background.
BRCWRT continues to work with
Prince William County’s (PWC) Historical Commission, Board of County Supervisors, Historic Preservation Division and Historic Preservation Foundation and the City of Manassas Park to preserve and interpret Signal (Willcoxon) Hill. The PWC Board of Supervisors received funds from Verizon as part of the use agreement for Signal Hill Park property used for the cellular communications tower installed in 2017.

Special Use Permit Verizon at Signal Hill Park:

  • The intent is to 1) use these funds to conduct a preservation study of the Signal (Willcoxon) Hill site, 2) link the Cayden Ridge walkway into the Signal Hill parking lot/memorial site, 3) preserve and interpret Signal (Willcoxon) Hill

  • Both the City of Manassas Park and the Prince William County Planning Office have included the preservation and interpretation of Signal (Willcoxon) Hill in their long range planning document

    Threatened Site: Signal (Willcoxon Hill)

    BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Conduct a Signal Hill Preservation Study

    o Site Management

    o Site Preservation and Interpretation

  • Develop and implement a Signal Hill Preservation and Interpretation Plan

  • Establish pedestrian access to Signal Hill by connecting the existing pathway to the

    Signal Hill parking area/Signal Corps monument site

    Status Summary:
    On September 20, 2018 BRCWRT representatives (Kim Brace and Blake Myers) met with
    Calvin O’Dell, Director Manassas Park Community Development, Jay Swisher, Manassas Park Parks Director and Michelle Barry, Manassas Park Planning and Zoning Administrator to discuss the status of funding for the preservation study of Signal (Willcoxon) Hill. There was clearly staff support for this initiative; however, to move forward requires getting the preservation of Signal Hill incorporated into the City of Manassas Park’s strategic planning document and its Capital Improvement Plan. Calvin O’Oell indicated the following items would be useful to the city planning staff in developing the requisite inputs for both documents:

17


  • PWC strategic plan wording regarding Signal Hill and its preservation (for use in developing similar language for Manassas Park’s strategic planning document)

  • Signal Hill preservation and interpretation vision/concept

  • Example of a Preservation Study (Bristoe Station and Kettle Run Battlefields

    Preservation Study)

    BRCWRT provided the following documents to Calvin O’Dell, Director Manassas Park Community Development on October 9 & 10, 2018:

  • PWC Historical Commission strategic plan wording regarding Signal Hill, its historical significance and preservation objectives

  • Digital link (PWC Webpage) to Bristoe Station and Kettle Run Battlefields Preservation Study

  • A Signal Hill Preservation and Interpretation Concept

    During their May 7, 2019 meeting, the Prince William Board of County Supervisors approved a Boundary Line adjustment between PWC and the City of Manassas Park that affects ownership of Signal Hill Park, Historic Signal Hill and Generals Ridge Golf Course....all of which transfer to the ownership of the City of Manassas Park.

    During their December 10, 2019 Prince William Board of County Supervisors meeting, the Board approved the transfer of the $10,000.00 proffer for the purposes of historic preservation and/or enhancements to Signal Hill (076-0016) to PWC’s Historic Preservation Foundation. The Board also approved the Historic Foundation’s Annual Work Plan for 2020, which includes a Signal Hill Cultural Resource Identification Study. This study is described in the Work Plan as “The completion of a cultural resource study to identify cultural resources and interpretive themes for the Civil War era site. Project to be completed in conjunction with the Prince William County Planning Office and the City of Manassas Park, Parks and Recreation Department.

    As of February 15, 2020, the proffer funds have not been transferred to the PWC Historic Foundation; however, the PWC Planning Office expects the transfer to be accomplished by May 2020.

    On February 18, 2020 Kim Brace attended the PWC Planning Commission Public Meeting regarding, among other items, Comprehensive Plan Amendment, CPA #20-01:

  • Designate approximately 191 acres of Blooms Park and approximately 105 acres of land known as Signal Hill Park, Historic Signal Hill, Parcel D, Section 2, Roseberry Subdivision and an abutting portion of Blooms Road right-of-way, addressed as 9300 Signal View Drive, Manassas, VA 20111, as recreation

  • Designate the approximately 20 acres of land known as Residue of the Catholic Diocese of Arlington, located southwest of the Digital Drive and Manassas Drive intersection in Manassas Park, as Private Institution.

    And Rezoning Request, RZ #20-012:

Blooms Park, addressed as 9701 Manassas Drive, Manassas Park, VA 20111,

containing approximately 292 acres, from PUD, Planned unit development district

18


and A-1, Agriculture to PF, Public facilities district for use as a voter registration

office, library and public park,
.Signal Hill Park, Historic Signal Hill, Parcel D, Section 2, Roseberry Subdivision and

an abutting portion of Blooms Road right-of-way, addressed as 9300 Signal View Drive, Manassas, VA 20111, containing approximately 105 acres from A-1, agriculture district to PF, Public facilities district for use as a public park.

[A potential issue exists with proposed actions regarding the Bloom’s Park property is it includes in the north western most section of the park (bottom of the hill) sites where the phase 1 or 2 report on the park indicated troop encampment sites for the units guarding Signal Hill, with a portion of that site extending onto the Diocese. Manassas Park should conduct a Phase 1 & Phase 2 study on the Diocese property before they turn that specific area into a parking lot.]

The Planning Commission voted to recommend approval of CPA #20-01 and Rezoning Request RZ #20-012.

Parties Involved.
City of Manassas Park
Prince William County Planning Office
Prince William County Historical Commission
Prince William County Historic Preservation Division Prince William County Historic Preservation Foundation BRCWRT

Completed Actions/Activities.

BRCWRT provided the following to Calvin O’Dell, Director Manassas Park Community Development on October 9 & 10, 2018:

o PWC Historical Commission strategic plan wording regarding Signal Hill, its historical significance and preservation objectives

o Digital link (PWC Webpage) to Bristoe Station and Kettle Run Battlefields Preservation Study

o Signal Hill Preservation and Interpretation Concept

  • Blake Myers met with PWC Archaeologist Justin Patton (PWC Planning Office)on January 29, 2019; discussed Signal Hill and confirmed that the PWC Planning Office has received the proffered $10,000.00 for preservation and/or enhancement to Signal Hill.

  • Continued coordination, December 2019 Feb 2020, with Justin Patton to track transfer of proffer funds and site preservation activities.

  • Kim Brace attended February 18, 2020 Planning Commission Public Meeting and spoke about the issue concerning the Bloom’s Park property north-western-most section where the phase 1 & 2 report on the park indicated troop encampment sites

19


for the units guarding Signal Hill, with a portion of that site extending onto the Diocese property.

Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Continue to work with the PWC Historic Preservation Division, the PWC Historic

    Preservation Foundation, the PWC Historical Commission, the PWC Planning Office,

    and the City of Manassas Park to preserve and interpret Signal Hill

  • Meet with the City of Manassas Planner, Calvin O’Dell, to continue discussions

    regarding Signal Hill preservation and interpretation
    o Develop and implement a Signal Hill Preservation and Interpretation Plan

  • Coordinate with PWC Historic Preservation Foundation regarding planning for and conduct of Signal Hill Preservation Study

    o Site Management Plan

    o Site Preservation and Interpretation Plan

  • Conduct an on-site tour & history overview of Signal Hill for relevant partners in

    this project (tbd)

  • Work with the City of Manassas Park to provide pedestrian access to Signal Hill by

    connecting the existing pathway to the Signal Hill parking area/Signal Corps monument site

    Transform 66 Outside the Beltway Project

    Background. As part of a larger I-66 improvement project, Dynamic Tolling Express Lanes will be extended from the Capital Beltway to Gainesville.
    http://outside.transform66.org/

    Transforming I-66 by 2022; more than $3B in transportation improvements designed to:

  • Relieve congestion in all lanes

  • Provide for assert transit through Express Lanes

  • Move 2,000 to 4,000 more people per hour

  • Fund new buses and transit routes

  • Add 4,000 new park-and-ride spaces

  • Improve safety

    Project Overview:

  • Multi-modal improvements to 22.5 miles of I-66

  • Two Dynamic Tolling Express Lanes in each direction from I-495 to Gainesville

  • Three General Purpose Lanes in each direction

  • HOV and transit access to Express Lanes

  • Median Space reserved for future transit

  • Improved park-and-ride options with access to Express Lanes

  • Bike-pedestrian trail integrated with existing and planned trails

    Project segments

Segment 1 Gainesville to Route 234 Business to Route 29 in Centreville

20


  • Segment 2 Centreville to Route 28 to Route 50

  • Segment 3 Route 50 to Nutley Street to I-495

    Timeline

  • Start Up Activities, Jan - Mid 2017

  • Public Information Meetings, 12, 14 & 15 June 2017

  • Design Public Hearings, 13, 14, 16 November 2017

  • Begin construction and right-of-way acquisition, December 2017

  • Final Noise Study, Spring 2018

  • Route 28 Signalization, Summer 2020

  • Express Lanes open to traffic, December 2022

    FAM Construction, LLC, a partnership between Ferrovial Agroman US and Allan Myers VA Inc., is the design-build contractor for the I-66 Outside the Beltway Project.

    Threatened Sites: Manassas National Battlefield Park and Battlefield Sites

    BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Minimize impacts to Manassas National Battlefield Park and the Manassas

    Battlefields
    o MNBP viewsheds
    o Traffic noise and congestion o Roadway lighting

  • Complete Portici cultural landscape report

  • Ensure connectivity of BROT and MNBP trails at the site of the new I-66 bridge

    crossing Bull Run

    Status Summary:
    Project segment 1 (Gainesville to Centreville) design aspect that negatively impact the Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNB): Express Elevated Access Ramps (EARs) on both ends of Portici Plantation MNBP property bordering I-66, from Vandor Lane / Battleview Parkway intersection to Vandor Lane east of Virginia Welcome Center
    locally known as ‘Annie’s Dip’

  • View shed negatively impacted by EARs, and the removal of evergreen trees currently located between Vandor Lane and I-66 (widening of I-66 and increased median space)

  • Increased levels of Traffic noise that would result from the elevated ramps
    On January 17, 2019 VDOT issued executed MOA (without NPS/MNBP as signatory) for

    consulting party review and signature as a concurring party.

    On May 8, 2019 VODT/FA provided design plan updates to consulting parties for review. Comments submitted by the consulting parties based on their review of the plans provided highlighted the inability (based on the level of detail provided in the 60% design plans provided for Segment 1B) to assess design compliance with the stipulations included in the

21


January 2019 MOA (see MOA, pp 3-4). As of October 7, 2019 no additional consulting party meetings have been scheduled, and are not anticipated until the 90% design plans are provided for consulting party review later in 2019.

In a December 20, 2019 letter to VDOT (Mrs. Susan Shaw, Megaprojects Director, Northern Virginia District), MNBP Superintendent Bandon Bies requested that VDOT convene a meeting of consulting parties in January 2020 to discuss a number of outstanding and new issues concerning the I66 project segments impacting MNBP.

  • It has been more than a year since the MOA was signed (without NPS as a Signatory) in December 2018, and the last consulting party meeting was conducted on August 1, 2018

  • VDOT’s lack of follow up and transparency with multiple on-going issues identified by MNBP and other consulting parties is alarming

    MNBP and the NOVA trails community have identified an issue concerning the Bull Run Loop trail (BROT) (https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/vbwt/coastal-trail/cbr/) that crosses under updated I-66 bridge over Bull Run at the Prince William County - Fairfax County border. The ongoing bridge construction is, and the final construction may, result in blockage of the trail and its connection to the MNBP trail. NOVA Trails has mobilized a crowd to make it clear to VDOT and Express Mobility Partners that the current trail blockage, required to enable new bridge construction, must be removed and the trail reopened when the I-66 bridge construction is completed.

    In a January 16, 2020 e-mail from Tom Heil, FAM Construction LLC Deputy Design Manager, announces a Consulting Party meeting on February 27, 2020 at 10:00 AM (subsequently changed in January 20, 2020 e-mail to March 4, 2020); meeting location is to be determined. The following information is be provided to for review and comment approximately two weeks prior to the meeting date:

    Elevated Access Ramp (EARs) bridge plans (second review), MOA Stipulation 1.A.1; Proposed aesthetic treatments for WB EARs ramp including color (second review), MOA Stipulation 1.A.2;
    Segment 1B West roadway plans including signing and marking plans, lighting plans, ITS plans (third review), MOA Stipulations 1.A.3, 1.A.4, 1.A.5, 1.A.6, and 1.A.7; EARs vegetative screening / landscape plan (first review), MOA Stipulation 1.A.8; and

    CP comment responses to CP comments made on second plan submission, MOA Stipulation 1.B.3, in June 2019.

    VDOT provided consulting parties Design Plans for review (CD) via US Mail; received on February 27, 2020. CP review comments are due to FAM on or before April 8, 2020.

Segment 1B West (portion of I66 from west of Balls Ford Park-and-Ride lot to east of Sudley Road); Specific portions relevant to MNBP vicinity of Vandor Lane

o Lighting Plans
o Signing and pavement marking plans

22


o ITS plans

  • WB EAR’s east of Sudley Road Bridge

  • Vegetative Screening Landscape Plan

  • CP Plan Review Comment Responses from May 2019 Plan set CP Review

    Parties Involved.
    VDOT - Northern Virginia District (4975 Alliance Drive, Fairfax Virginia 22033), Susan Shaw, P.E. (Megaprojects Director)
    National Park Service (NPS) / Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP), Brandon Bies (Superintendent)
    American Battlefield Trust (Civil War Trust) (ABT)
    Manassas Battlefield Trust (MBT)
    Bull Run Civil War Round Table (BRCWRT)
    Piedmont Environmental Council
    Central Virginia Battlefields Trust (CVBT)
    Prince William County (PWC) Planning Office
    Prince William Conservation Alliance
    NOVA Trails

    Completed Actions/Activities:

  • BRCWRT provided comments to final Draft MOA on November 14, 2018

  • BRCWRT participated in November 19, 2018 teleconference to discuss MOA

  • Subsequent to consultations with MNBP and other consulting parties, BRCWRT

    responded to VDOT regarding the executed MOA (January 17, 2019):

    While the Bull Run Civil War Round Table (BRCWRT) has no specific issues with the recitals or stipulations in the MOA, we are of the opinion that the National Park Service (NPS) / Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP) should be an MOA Signatory. The impacts of ATC 30 on MNBP are the basis for the adverse effect determination, the reason for the MOA, and several of the mitigation measures addressed in the MOA will require NPS/MNBP action in moving forward to mitigate the adverse effects identified. From a process perspective it seems shortsighted, inefficient and less than optimal to exclude NPS / MNBP as a Signatory to the MOA.

    BRCWRT desires to continue serving as a consulting party, but for the reason

    cited above declines to sign the MOA, in its current form, as a concurring party.

  • Reviewed and coordinated comments/input on the 60% Segment 1B design plans provided by VDOT in May 2019

    Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Review Feb 2020 Plan Designs provided by FAM and submit comments on or before

    April 8, 2020

  • Maintain communication and coordination with MNBP Superintendent, Brandon

    Bies

  • Coordinate actions with Manassas Battlefield Trust POC Christy Forman

23


  • Attend consulting party meetings next meeting scheduled for March 4, 2020

  • Submit, as appropriate, additional comments and information

  • Monitor developments

    Limb Pit Discovery at Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP)

    Background.
    During a planned MNBP utility excavation in October 2014, the archeologist monitoring the work recovered bone fragments from the project site, suggesting the presence of disarticulated human remains consistent with the use of the site as a field hospital, resulting in the recommendation for further archeological testing to confirm the interpretation and to determine the relationship among the archeological feature, artifacts, and human remains

    In October 2015, NPS archeologists and contract archeologists conducted further testing at the site and discovered two nearly intact sets of skeletal remains mingled with amputated limbs, and made the decision to conduct a program of data recovery to excavate the remains which were then transported to the NPS Museum Resource Center

    In April 2016, the NPS transferred the recovered remains to the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) for forensic analysis, resulting in findings that the remains were associated with Union casualties from the Second Battle of Manassas. The two sets of remains were determined to be Union soldiers from the New England area, and likely from upstate NY.

    The two sets of remains were transferred from NPS to The Army and Arlington National Cemetery on June 19, 2018

  • The remains were interred as ‘unknowns’ at Arlington National Cemetery on September 6, 2018 as part of the dedication ceremony for the new Arlington Millennium Section

  • Remains were wrapped in replica Union blankets and placed in a ‘toe-pincher’ wooden coffin constructed from the trunk of a 90-year old MNBP tree that fell during recent windstorm the wooden coffin was placed inside a modern military casket for interment

    Disposition and interpretation of limb pit and pit artifacts remain under discussion and are to-be-determined.

    BRCWRT Objectives:
    Historic interpretation of the limb pit and excavated limbs (using photographs and

    3-D models)
    Historical marker for cremated remains and the two soldiers’ remains re-interred at

    Arlington National Military Cemetery.

24


Status Summary:
The National Park Service and MNBP hosted a Section 106 consulting party meeting Monday, December 3, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. to focus on the disposition and interpretation of the limb pit, discovered limbs and bone fragments/pieces, and other artifacts

  • A representative from the Office of the Army General Counsel reviewed the current Army position regarding the limb pit remains

  • Dr. Doug Owsley, Smithsonian forensic archaeologist, provided an overview of limb pit discoveries to date and the site itself:

    • -  13 total sets of remains discovered
      2 sets of intact remains (remains interred in Arlington National Cemetery)
      4 sets of disturbed, broken, scattered remains (no medical value); disturbed by plowing, initial trench dig, etc.
      6 limbs (4 legs, 2 arms)
      1 other limb (item remains partially buried in pit)

    • -  Uniqueness of site is due to its location- on the battlefield and not in a general hospital and the surgery conducted was done within 24-36 hours after the battle

    • -  Presents a unique opportunity for public knowledge and historical interpretation within a true battlefield context

    • -  Medical and surgical procedures used indicate the work of a skilled surgeon

    • -  Analysis can determine region of country from which the amputated limbs

      originate and potentially the soldiers from which the limbs came

  • The limb pit discoveries are currently held by the Smithsonian, on loan from NPS

  • General consensus of consulting parties is to retain the limbs for further medical &

    DNA analysis

  • Army representative presented a potential compromise position, based on

    additional medical value analysis and assessment of limb pit remains

    The National Park Service and MNBP hosted a Section 106 consulting party meeting Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 1:00 p.m.

Limb assessment and recommendation paper provided by Doug Owsley and Kirin Bruwelheide on March 1, 2019

o Bones of seven archaeologically recovered limbs and one partial, amputated femur for curation to enable integrated historical and scientific research to produce information for interpretation and historical purposes (and potentially identification of soldiers)

Unique opportunity to better understand (and interpret) CW

battlefield surgical treatment and amputations
o Bones of four limbs and unmatched foot fragments damaged by backhoe

work in the limb pit to be considered for disposition by the Army
Majority of consulting parties concur with recommendation for NPS to retain the

limb bones with medical value for curation to inform historical understanding and interpretation

25


  • Army is undecided

  • NPS to draft proposal for consulting parties’ consideration that addresses:

o Retention of eight limbs by NPS for curation and further research
o Completing the excavation of the limb pit and recovery of any additional

limbs or bone fragments
o Reassess the damaged limbs based on additional discoveries that enhance

the value of any of the damaged limbs for curation purposes
o NPS to retain custody of limbs identified for curation
o NPS to determine, in coordination with the Army, disposition of limbs and

bone fragments not retained for curation

Received on September 6, 2019 a National Park Service (NPS) proposed amendment to the Memorandum of Agreement signed in June 2018, to address the disposition of amputated limbs discovered at Manassas National Battlefield Park and the in situ archeological resources located at the discovery site. The amendment reflects the discussions that occurred at the consulting party meetings held on December 3, 2018, and March 7, 2019. (Comments requested no later than Friday, September 20, 2019.)

  • Army non-concurred based on position that the proposed MOA Amendment did not convey how Army's concerns were taken into account; Army thinks that further consultation will allow the parties to reach agreement

  • Army requested to e-engage and continue with meaningful consultation on the final disposition of the remains at the conclusion of reasonable scientific studies and the path forward regarding the in-situ remains. What constituted a 'reasonable time period' and whether Army would consider a casketed burial instead of cremation in order to protect the remains were some of the unresolved issues being discussed in consultation.

    Consulting Party Meeting on October 31, 2019 - MNBP Superintendent Brandon Bies provided an overview of actions to date since re-initiating the NHPA Section 106 consultative process on October 30, 2018 regarding the limb pit remains discovered at MNBP in 2014/5

  • Discussed NPS primary focus protect the resources (ground/site) and tell the story (interpretation)

  • Reviewed NMHM paper summarizing the analysis of limbs/remains (11 amputated limbs and scattered bone fragments) discovered to date

  • Summarized the essence of the proposed MOA amendment
    o 10-year loan agreement (standard NPS practice) with NMHM of 7 amputated

    limbs deemed of medical value

o Remainder of limbs deemed of limited medical value and bone fragments

transfer to the Army for disposition
o Complete site excavation - assess and treat newly discovered limbs/remains

in similar manner

  • Reviewed substantive comments on proposed MOA amendment received by NPS

  • Introduced NMHM letter received on October 28, 2019

26


Army OGC representative, presented the Army’s views and concerns with proposed Moa Amendment

  • Noted this issue has attention of SES-level political appointees at HQDA

  • Important to balance the desire for research/education with the respectful

    treatment of remains

  • Questioned time frame of 10 years for research, study and analysis

  • Questioned how limbs might be used in interpretation (public displays)

    On November 26, 2019 NPS/MNBP provided a revised draft MOA amendment that incorporated revisions discussed during the October 31, 2019 consulting party meeting.

  • Feedback on the revised draft MOA amendment was due to NPS (MNBP) by December 18, 2019

  • Army postponed input submission until January 2020

  • BRCWRT input provided to MNBP on January 4, 2020 primarily recommended

    edits and revisions to Amendment wording for clarification and consistency. No

    major issues from BRCWRT’s perspective.

  • As of February 28, 2020, the Army has not responded, nor provided any comments or input

    on the revised draft MOA Amendment.

  • NPS/MNBP is in consultation with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

    (ACHP) regarding Army’s intransience and options to effectively proceed with he Section 106 process

    Federal Agencies involved:

  • National Park Service (NPS)

  • Department of the Army

  • Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP)

    Consulting Parties:

  • Virginia State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO)

  • Archaeological Society of Virginia

  • Bull Run Civil War Round Table

  • Manassas Battlefield Trust

  • National Museum of Health and Medicine

  • National Museum of Natural History

  • Prince William County Historic Preservation Division

  • Prince William County Historical Commission

  • Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

    Planned Actions/Activities:

The next Section 106 consulting party meeting is to be scheduled

27


Gainesville Crossing (Latsios Property)

Background.
This property, an approximately 200-
acre tract along Pageland Lane opposite Stuart’s Hill & MNBP HQ & Visitor Center, is located on the south side of Lee Hwy (Route 29) between its intersections with Heathcote Blvd/ I-66 Exit 43B off ramp and Pageland Lane.

Historical Significance - Battle of 2nd Manassas (Bull Run)

  • Action in opening stages of Brawner Farm engagement

  • Longstreet, Lee, Jackson 29 August 1862 meeting site marker later moved during

    Route 29 expansion/widening to current location

  • Texas Field Hospital site

  • Site of a monument to Timothy Dunklin, 4th Texas Infantry, killed at the Battle of

    Second Manassas; died at Texas field hospital site

    BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Minimize impact on Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP) and 2nd Manassas

    Battlefield
    o MNBP Viewshed
    o Vehicleparking
    o Traffic noise
    o Minimize building impacts

    Building(s) visibility (height, location, screening) External color scheme
    External lighting
    External signage

    External mechanical equipment

  • Include, as appropriate and as coordinated with the PWC Archaeologist, NOVA Relic

    Hunters as part of metal detecting to be conducted at Site 44 PW 1792, adjacent to

    the William H. Brown House, and the area described on Exhibit A.

  • Preserve and restore Dunklin Monument and site

  • Public access to, and historic marker for, Lee-Longstreet-Jackson meeting marker

    Status Summary:
    In August 2019 the developer submitted a rezoning request, #REZ2018-00008, Gainesville Crossing (Gainesville Magisterial District)
    - a request to rezone ±152.7 acres from A-1, Agricultural, to PBD, Planned Business District, to allow a mix of commercial uses, and a modification to allow for by-right data centers, an electric substation, and other uses in the PBD district. The application also includes waivers and modifications.

    On November 13, 2019 Blake Myers received an email from Prince William Conservation Alliance with information and a link to the PWC Planning Office Memorandum to the PWC Planning Commission containing the staff analysis of and recommendations concerning the rezoning request.

    On November 14, 2019 BRCWRT members (Mark Trbovich, Blake Myers, Kim Brace and John DePue) received via email a letter from Michael R. Vanderpool, Esq., attorney handling

28


the Gainesville Crossing rezoning request for the developer. This letter, dated November 8, 2019, indicated that the developer (and attorney) had been provided a copy of BRCWRT’s January 24, 2018 letter, and had been working diligently with the Superintendent of Manassas National Battlefield Park on the project and the proposed proffers.

The Proffer Statement, according to the letter received, was initiated on August 13, 2019, and updated on September 13, 2019; September 23, 2019; October 21, 2019; October 29, 2019 and November 8, 2019.

Summary of proposed proffers:

The Applicant has commissioned a preliminary KOCOA Study and has authorized a study of the initial artillery engagement that occurred near the intersection of Route 29 and Pageland Lane on the morning of August 28. Additionally, metal detecting will be conducted in an area identified by the County Archeologist. You may be aware of the fact that prior studies were performed on the property, including approximately 1,000 shovel digs. The additional research the Applicant is conducting will add to the knowledge resulting from those prior studies.

The proffers also provide for preservation along Route 29 (including the replanting of an area now occupied by an electric line) and along the eastern boundary of the property that abuts the right of way for the extension of the potential Bi-County Parkway. In addition, the Applicant is providing 300 additional trees to be planted at locations on the property or the Battlefield at locations, specified by the Battlefield Superintendent, that will supplement the viewshed protection. The potential locations of the plantings were informed by balloon tests, site inspections and studies. Those tests, inspections and studies also led to establishment of height limits for all structures to be built on the property.

The Applicant is also going to dedicate approximately 6 acres of land surrounding the Dunklin Monument to the American Battlefield Trust or to the County and is also contributing $25,000.00 for improvements in that area. That will be at the discretion of the National Park Service in conjunction with the Trust/County, but that could include the types of improvements you suggest in your letter. This area would be across from the Battlefield facility on Stuart's Hill and convenient to visitors.

Finally, and importantly, the change of land use to a data center will provide a very low impact use on the portion of the property east of University Boulevard. This use generates minimal traffic that would travel through the Battlefield. In addition to height limits for the buildings, the Applicant has also committed to architectural proffers and a unique proffer that would provide for variable coloration of roof top equipment screening.

Specific Proffers Relevant to BRCWRT Concerns:

The applicable archaeological sites are those identified as 44 PW 1792 and the area identified on Exhibit A hereto. Site 44 PW 1792, adjacent to the William H. Brown House, will be the subject of a Phase II study including metal detection and a review of the life of William H. Brown. The area described on Exhibit A will be subject to metal detecting and a report regarding the purported artillery incident on or near the property pursuant to the

29


scope of work prepared by the County Archaeologist as of September 23, 2019. The Applicant will curate in accordance with the recommendations of the reports. The reports and curation shall be in accordance with accepted standards, and the reports shall be prepared and submitted to the Director of Planning or his or her designee prior to submission of the first site plan.

Land Bay D shall be donated to the American Battlefield Trust or its designee with a restrictive covenant that it shall remain maintained in an undisturbed state except as provided below. If the American Battlefield Trust declines said donation, the Applicant shall donate the land bay D to the County, or its designee or, if they decline said donation, then the County. Said donation shall occur prior to the final site plan approval for Land Bay A The Applicant shall contribute $25,000.00 to the American Battlefield Trust or its designee within one year of final non-appealed zoning approval for plantings in or improvements to Land Bay D related to the Civil War, such as the relocation of an historical marker currently located in Conway Robinson State Forest, a Civil War Trail interpretive sign, and the repair of the Dunklin Monument.

On November 19, 2019 BRCWRT submitted a letter to PWC Planning Office with our concerns regarding the Rezoning Request#REZ2018-00008, Gainesville Crossing. Based on the attorney’s November 14, 2019 letter, the developer effectively addressed all BRCWRT

30


requests and concerns with the exception of the meeting marker and proposed historical site/kiosk at the pond.

On November 20, 2019 The PWC Planning Commission conducted a public hearing on Rezoning Request#REZ2018-00008, Gainesville Crossing. The Planning Commission voted 6-2 to approve, but with amendments related to the power supply. Although there was discussion about the impacts on the battlefield and viewshed, the primary concern was the power capacity issue, including citizen concerns with not repeating the Haymarket transmission line fiasco. Several Commissioners were concerned with the lack of data concerning electrical power capacity available to support the planned data centers, and the potential to have to either increase the capacity of the new transmission line, or to add another connection from the transmission line that runs along the western edge of MNBP.

The Planning Commission voted (6-2) to recommend approval of the Rezoning Request with two stipulations/amendments:

  • Confirmation from Dominion, certified by professional engineers, that the no additional power transmission will be required to service the proposed data centers

  • Inclusion of ‘hard data’ that indicates where the power for the proposed data centers is coming from, location of transmission lines that will service the proposed data centers, and the redundancy plan for sustaining electrical power in case of emergency(ies)

    On November 28, 2019 Blake Myers e-mailed Michael R. Vanderpool, Esq., attorney handling the Gainesville Crossing rezoning request for the developer, thanking him for his letter received via e-mail on November 14, 2019 and for working with the relevant parties to resolve the majority of our concerns with the proposed project. The e-mail also included a summary of BRCWRT concerns regarding the proposed plans for the Lee-Jackson- Longstreet Meeting Marker. Mr. Vanderpool response indicated the nonviability of relocating the marker south of Rt 29 due to insufficient space for a pedestrian trail and parking lot for public access.

    On December 10, 2019 the PWC Board of County Supervisors voted (7-1 [Frank Principi, Woodbridge]) to approve Rezoning Request#REZ2018-00008, Gainesville Crossing.

    BRCWRT members Blake Myers and Kim Brace met with MNBP Superintendent Brandon Bies and Chief of Interpretation Ray Brown on December 18, 2019 to discuss the Data Center Rezoning, the donated parcel containing the Dunklin Monument, the Lee-Jackson- Longstreet Meeting Marker and associated aspects of the property development, including information provided by Mike Vanderpool. Information discussed during this meeting included:

Donated parcel containing the Dunklin Monument
o ABT will accept the parcel donation, with ultimate plan to donate it to the

NPS as part of MNBP
o A Dunklin Family member contacted MNBP and indicated they have a deed

for the land parcel on which the Dunklin Monument is located 31


o Superintendent Bies asked if BRCWRT would be interested in following up with the Dunklin Family member regarding this deed. Blake Myers agreed to do so and requested that the family member’s contact information be provided to him (Blake) awaiting this information

  • VDOT Right of Way for Bi-County Parkway
    o If VDOT gives up the ROW, the first right of refusal is to the owner of the

    ‘Latsios property’
    o The developers proffer surrenders this first right of refusal to the owner of

    the preserved (donated) parcel

  • PWC Trail along US Route 29

    o PWC Comprehensive Plan includes a multi-modal trail on eh north side of Rt 29

o County wants to tie this trail into NPS trail near Brawner Farm NPS is opposed to this as NPS does not allow bikes on trails within its parks

o This trail could conceivably provide parking and access to the current location of the Lee-Jackson-Longstreet Meeting Marker

Interpretive Marker on Artillery action during early phases of 2nd Battle of Manassas o Location is intended to be in the donated (preserved) parcel adjacent to the

intersection of Rt 29 and Pageland Lane

Parties Involved.
Prince William County Planning Office
Prince William County Historical Commission
National Park Service / Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP) Manassas Battlefield Trust (MBT)
BRCWRT
Prince William Conservation Alliance

Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Maintain contact and coordination with PWC Planning Office, MNBP, and PW

    Conservation Alliance

  • Coordinate with PWC Archaeologist for incorporating NOVA Relic Hunters in site

    metal detecting as part of Archaeologist study

  • Coordinate with MNBP in restoration and preservation of Dunklin monument

  • Monitor developments regarding Lee-Longstreet- Jackson meeting marker and trail

    on north side of Rt 29

32


Bristoe Station and Kettle Run Battlefields Preservation Study Comprehensive Plan Update

Background:
On June 18, 2019 the Bristoe Station Preservation Study Comprehensive Plan Amendment (CPA2018-00002) hearing scheduled for the Board of Supervisors meeting was deferred to September 3, 2019. The deferral, requested by Supervisor Lawson (Brentsville District), was based on a letter submitted by the Northern Virginia Building Industry Association (NVBIA) requesting that the Board of Supervisors reject the CPA2018-00002 and handle the issue through the Rural Area Preservation Study Implementation (CPA2018-00009).

The two preservation studies (Bristoe Station and Kettle Run Battlefields Preservation Study, Rural Area Preservation Study) have completely different purposes and focus, and no direct inter-relationship. BRCWRT’s Preservation Committee is continuing to work with the Prince William County Planning Office and the Prince William County Historical Commission in sustaining support for the Board of Supervisors to adopt CPA2018-00002. CPA2018-00002 can be reviewed and comments submitted at the link: http://www.pwcgov.org/government/dept/planning/Pages/Comprehensive-Plan- Update.aspx

BRCWRT Objective: Adoption of Bristoe Station Preservation Study Comprehensive Plan Amendment CPA 2018-0002

Status Summary:
Revisions to the Prince William County Comprehensive Plan based on recommendations from the Rural Area Study update (CPA2018-00009) will have no direct impact on the recommendations being considered in CPA2018-00002. According to PWC Planning Office personnel, the Rural Area Study Update and CPA2018-00008 will not be completed and considered by the Planning Commission until 2020 (dates/timeline to be determined). A Planning Commission Rural Area Study Working Session is scheduled for October 23, 2019, followed by a Planning Commission Hearing that is yet to be scheduled.

The Board of Supervisors consideration of CPA2018-0002 has been deferred beyond September 3 to date to be determined. In its June 2019 decision to defer consideration and discussion until the September 3 meeting, the Board of Supervisors directed the PWC Planning Office to meet with affected landowners to gain a better understanding of their concerns with the draft CPA and to recommend any appropriate adjustments. As of January 2020, that meeting has not occurred.

Justin Patton, PWC Archaeologist, met with the property owner concerned, Mrs. Parker, on February 13, 2020 to discuss relevant issues/concerns with CPA2018-0002. No specific issues were identified; however, Mrs. Parker is in the process of marketing her property in hopes of selling it in the near term and will be concerned with any CPA provision that would potentially impact the value of her land. The next step is for the Planning Office to document this meeting and discussion, then re-engage the PWC Board of County Supervisors on the CPA and the results of the meeting with the concerned landowner. The timeframe for these actions is ‘to be determined’ but is anticipated for May 2020.

33


Parties Involved:
PWC Planning Commission
PWC Board of County Supervisors PWC Historical Commission BRCWRT

Planned Actions/Activities:

  • As appropriate, schedule and conduct a follow up meeting with Supervisor Lawson

  • Attend and speak in favor of the CPA during public hearing(s) scheduled by PWC

    Board of Supervisors

    Mt Zion Battlefield & Mt. Zion Historic Park

  • Protect Mt. Zion
  • Protect Mt. Zion petition

    Background:
    Located immediately to your left and across Route 50 from Gilbert's Corner, the Mt. Zion Old School Baptist Church was built in 1851. The church was a place of worship for Old School Baptists until 1980 and served various purposes during the Civil War, including a
    rendezvous point for Mosby’s Rangers, a hospital and prison, and a battleground. The adjacent cemetery contains more than 240 marked headstones, and a War of 1812 veteran. The battle of Mt. Zion on July 6, 1864 pitted Union forces against the famed Mosby and his Rangers who won the day.

    In February 2020 a developer submitted a proposed site plan for the private property adjacent to historic Mt. Zion Church to Loudoun County. As currently zoned, there are no restrictions on the by right development for this property.

    Threatened Site: Mt. Zion Battlefield

    BRCWRT Objective: Preserve Mt. Zion Battlefield, or at a minimum mitigate the impact of development on the historic battlefield

    Status Summary:
    Several organizations and a number of concerned citizens, led by the Ohana Preservation Association (an equestrian organization) and the Mosby Heritage Area Association (MHAA), have organized and are working to diffuse and/or mitigate the imminent threat to this historic land. Current plans of this group include:

• •

Letters to be sent to Loudoun County and the County Engineer, expressing a general concern that a development would destroy this important historic resource

Launch of a website to spread awareness about the importance of preserving the battlefield (~230 acres), stressing that it also contributes to the Mt. Zion Church experience and rural gateway viewshed. The website will collect sympathetic "signatures" (name/email).

Nominating the battlefield for addition to Preservation Virginia's and American Battlefield Trust's most endangered historic places/battlefield list.

34

Writing a news article intended for release to Loudoun Now and local newspapers about the issue. Emphasizing MHAA's Aldie Triangle to emphasize that this historic resource is already an important and treasured element in student education. MHAA is planning one of its history video clips at the Battlefield for use on Facebook.

Initial discussions with a potential "Angel Investor" who is very interested in


purchasing the property.
The effort is focused on creating sufficient public outcry that the developer sees a headache coming and turns his energy elsewhere.

Parties Involved:

  • Ohana Preservation Foundation

  • Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority (NOVA Parks)

  • Mosby Heritage Area Association (MHAA)

  • Piedmont Environmental Council (PEC)

  • American Historical Association (AHA)

  • BRCWRT

    Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Maintain contact and coordination with NOVA Parks, Ohana Preservation

    Foundation and MHAA

  • Publish news article, once approved & released, in BRCWRT’s Stone Wall newsletter

  • Monitor developments

35

 Long-Term Preservation Initiatives:

Military Railroad Park, Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA)

Background:
Located at 6850 Colonel Taylor Lane (Centreville), the Military Railroad Park (44FX1770) in Centreville includes a Fairfax County Historical Marker on Compton Road and remnants of the bed of the Confederate Military Rail Road (CMRR) that parallels and extends beyond Colonel Taylor Lane and continues to parallel to (and to the rear of HOA homes on) Meeting Camp Road . This FCPA Park is not being effectively monitored or maintained, has become overgrown, encroached upon by HOA residents adjacent to the park, and is virtually non- accessible.

BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Properly preserve, interpret and protect extant CMRR bed remnants

  • Develop and implement a Military Railroad Park Preservation and Interpretation

    Plan
    o Site Management Plan
    o Site Preservation and Interpretation Plan

    Status Summary:
    What was once a well-maintained, albeit small, park area has atrophied due to neglect and is no longer readily accessible or viewable.

    Parties Involved: FCPA
    BRCWRT

    Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Address the status and condition of the park with FCPA

  • Confirm whether FCPA currently has, and is implementing a Preservation and

    Interpretation Plan for the park

  • In conjunction with FCPA, develop (as necessary) a plan to preserve, interpret and

    maintain park and the extant Historical Marker to ensure meaningful public access and visitation

    Confederate Fortifications Historic Site (formerly Union Mills Historic Site)

    Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA)

    Background.
    Located off of Balmoral Avenue between Centreville and Clifton, the Confederate Fortifications Site includes two fenced-in areas
    the A-Fort fortification [44FX506] and the Battery Hill/Great Redoubt fortification. Both sites have been studied and examined, and in January 2005 the Fairfax County Park Authority Board approved the General Management Plan for the site. Subsequently FCPA contracted with John Milner Associates, Inc. for development of a site treatment plan. This plan, the Confederate Fortifications Site

36


Treatment Plan, was delivered to the FCPA in May 2006. Due to concerns raised by some residents living near the site, none of the elements (archaeological assessments, parking area, interpretive trails, markers, etc.) of the General Management Plan or Treatment Plan have ever been implemented. The two areas were each enclosed by a chain-link fence, with a locked gate, and left alone. The Fairfax County Historical Marker that was installed along Balmoral Avenue is no longer visible from the roadway due to the growth of trees around it.

BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Properly preserve, interpret and protect extant fortifications and campsite

    remnants

  • Implement the approved General Management Plan and Treatment Plan,

    establishing a publicly accessible historic site
    o Site Preservation and Interpretation Plan

  • Develop and implement a Site Management Plan

    Status Summary:
    What was once on track to be a preserved and interpreted historical park has atrophied due
    local homeowners’ opposition to the park and FCPA neglect. Large trees felled by storms threaten the earthworks and in several cases have significantly damaged the chain- link fence installed to protect, by deterring access, the two areas.

    Parties Involved: FCPA
    BRCWRT

    Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Address the status and condition of the site with FCPA

  • Confirm whether FCPA current has, and is implementing, maintenance and

    monitoring plan(s) for the site

  • In conjunction with FCPA, develop (as necessary) a plan to implement the approved

    General Management Plan and Treatment Plan, establishing a publicly accessible historic site

37


Sites and Projects Being Monitored

Liberia Road Development

Background:
Property on the northeast corner of Liberia Ave and Prince William Parkway is in the process of a two-phased development. The northern part of the property is being developed (construction), and the southern portion (next to the Parkway) is in the development plan approval process. This property includes the site of a camp for Alabama (and possibly North Carolina) confederate troops during 1861.

Status Summary:
In May 2018 Kim went before the PWC Planning Commission and proposed that the developer install a historic marker and set aside a small area of the planned parking lot for the creation of a "History Plaza", similar to what was installed in Gettysburg at the site of Camp Letterman. The attorney representing the developer at this meeting told the Commission that he talked with his client that evening and he agreed to install historical signage.

Kim Brace, Preservation Committee member and Chairman, PWC Historical Commission, was informed by the developer in June 2018 that the development will include an historical plaza with two historical markers (details to be determined).

Featherbed Lane (Manassas National Battlefield Park)

Background. During 2016 a traffic and engineering study was conducted for Featherbed Lane roadway improvement options. The Prince William County Department of Transportation (PWC DOT) conducted a Community Work Group Meeting on October 25, 2016 to gather public opinions on the options presented in the roadway study. The meeting included an overview of the study’s findings and results and collection of community input and feedback on potential roadway improvement options.

Featherbed Lane, an unpaved road with limited two-way traffic, is the sole unimproved roadway remaining within Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP) and traverses key terrain of the 2nd Manassas Battlefield. Key preservation concerns include the impact of improvement options under consideration (paving and straightening the roadway) on the historic character of Featherbed Lane within MNBP, leading to increased use by commuters as an alternative to Route 234.

The National Park Service (NPS) is a primary property owner of Featherbed Lane and land adjacent to Featherbed Lane, with VDOT holding a 30-foot wide prescriptive easement. The majority of the property on both sides of the roadway is included in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Manassas National Battlefield.

The NPS’s primary concerns focus on preserving the roadway setting, which includes dense tree cover, as well as the safety of the public at the three existing MNBP trail crossings of Featherbed Lane, particularly the crossing at General Trimbles Lane. NPS is open to minor

38


roadway improvements, including minor construction to fix drainage problems, provided the improvements can be completed without significant impacts to existing tree canopy or encroachment beyond the 30-foot prescriptive roadway easement.

Status Summary:
VDOT has funds and wants to pave Featherbed Lane up to the intersection with General Trimbles Lane. Local homeowners initially supported paving contingent on including traffic calming measures
current traffic count/use data does not qualify for traffic calming measures. Homeowners do not support paving without traffic calming measures. NPS/MNBP is ok with paving, but notes that paving will lead to increased traffic and increased vehicular speed - requiring a four way stop (traffic calming measure) at intersectionofFeatherbedLaneandGeneralTrimblesLane. NPS/MNBPdoesnotsupport reducing the embankment at the intersection (a section of unfinished railroad [Manassas Gap Railroad] along General Trimbles Lane) to enhance sight lines / visibility at intersection.

Project is on hold (a/o 21 November 2017)

General Longstreet Line Neighborhood (Zuave Hills) (Manassas National

Battlefield Park)

Potential for development as homeowners seek to sell property (north side of Groveton Road)

Park Ridge Business Mall (Manassas National Battlefield Park)

(Bulloch Drive - off of Business 234; borders MNBP & Chinn Ridge)
Potential to be sold or to go out of business (several buildings are empty) - future use & potential impact on MNBP

Pageland Lane (Manassas National Battlefield Park)

Property owners exploring development opportunities (Snyder farm and two others)

Broad Run Golf Academy (Bristoe Station Battlefield)

Background. This property is well within the core Bristoe Station Battlefield and contains some winter hut sites. Much of this property is classified as wetlands.

Current Status. The Golf Academy property has recently been sold to a commercial interest that may seek tract rezoning; however, as of November 2017, no rezoning request or application has been filed with Prince William County (PWC).

39


Brown’s Battery Site (Bristoe Station Battlefield)

Background. In December 2016 the proposal to extend the Virginia Railway Express (VRE) line to Haymarket was abandoned. However, VRE is in the process of implementing approved plans for expanding the has announced plans to existing VRE Broad Run Station, including the storage track to accommodate the addition of 10 new passenger cars to the Broad Run-based fleet, constructing an expanded employee welfare building, increasing parking capacity, adding a third main track from the Broad Run Station to Wellington Road, and shifting the station platform to the east to accommodate the yard expansion and adding a pedestrian tunnel that will go under the rail tracks to the parking area.

Current Status. The project as described in VRE’s June 28, 2019 letter and north of the present VRE station does not encroach on the presumed Brown’s Battery site.

BRCWRT Objective: Incorporate Browns Battery site into Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park

Manassas Assembly of God Property (Bristoe Station Battlefield)

Background. The subject church-owned property includes the terrain over which Brig. Gen. William Kirkland's North Carolina Brigade advanced toward the railroad cut occupied by Union forces during the Battle of Bristoe Station. The Church and its pastor have, from time-to-time, proposed to develop the tract for various purposes including that of a for- profit cemetery. The southern half of this property is currently zoned M-2 (light Industrial); the entire property is shown as Flexible Employment Center on the Comprehensive Plan.

The Civil War Trust (CWT) has attempted to purchase the entirety of the tract of approximately 130 acres (or a significant portion thereof), but to date has been unsuccessful. This property is crucial to preserving the core Bristoe Station Battlefield.

Hylton Property (Bristoe Station Battlefield)

The southeast quadrant of the Bristoe Station Battlefield, incorporating portions of the Union defensive lines and the site of Arnold's battery is owned by Hylton Enterprises, a large-scale home developer in Prince William County (PWC). To date, we are not aware of any action(s) by Hylton to develop this tract.

Cockpit Point (Possum Point Battery Sites)
The incorporation of the Cockpit Point Battlefield Study and Battlefield Management Plan into Prince William County’s Comprehensive Plan offers potential funding for implementing study recommendations.

40


Eagles Point East Development (Civil War Fortifications)

Background.
Earthworks and a small artillery redoubt (44PW1229) are located along and on the ridge behind the Police HQ building across the parking lot from the A.J. Ferlazzo [PWC Government] Building at 15941 Donald Curtis Drive in Woodbridge.

The Eagles Point East housing development is on the top and south slope of the ridge, bordering US Rte 1. The artillery redoubt is fenced off in a protected area. The two lines of earthworks on the north slope of the ridge are not directly threatened by the development.

Submitted by the BRCWRT Preservation Committee:

Blake Myers (Chair) John Depue
Kim Brace
Rob Orrison

John Pearson Jim Lewis John Browne Dave Huxsoll

Cc: Bull Run Civil War Round Table Executive Committee Members

41




MEMORANDUM FOR: President, Bull Run Civil War Round Table

SUBJECT: 

In accordance with the BRCWRT By-Laws, the following constitutes the listing and summary status of Civil ara sites, buildings and/or memorials in our geographic area that are in need of protection, preservation, or restoration and will be the primary focus for BRCWRT preservation actions and activities during 2020. This list and its contents, which are not presented in order of priority, will be updated on a quarterly basis.

(See BRCWT 2017 thru 2019 Preservation Focus and Quarterly Updates for previous summaries and histories of listed actions and activities)

2020 Preservation Actions & Activities

Route 28 Transportation Study & Project (Blackburn’s Ford Battlefield)

www.route28study.com.
Background. The Northern Virginia
Transportation Authority (NVTA)’s Route 28 Transportation Study and Project is focused on infrastructure projects that will improve travel times and network reliability on Route 28 through Prince William County, the City of Manassas and the City of Manassas Park.

Fairfax County has approved plans to widen Route 28 from north of the Fairfax County/Prince William County border to US Route 29 to three lanes in each direction and make improvements to existing intersections (this project is scheduled for completion in 2023). Prince William County is widening Route 28 to a six-lane divided facility between Linton Hall Road and Pennsylvania Avenue. The City of Manassas is widening Route 28 to six lanes between Pennsylvania Avenue and Godwin Drive through the Prince William County Parkway (Rte. 234)/Route 28 interchange. These projects collectively will leave a section of Route 28 between Godwin Drive and Bull Run unimproved, with recurring daily congestion this is the section of Route 28 that is the focus of the Route 28 Transportation Study and Project.

The Route 28 Corridor Feasibility Study was the first step in a four-step project development process envisioned to culminate with project construction completed by 2024.
Step1: Feasibility Study
Identification of Highest Ranked Alternative
Step 2: Complete National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process (18-24 months; 2018 - 2019)
Selection of Preferred Alternative
Step 3: Final Design of the Preferred Alternative (36-42 months; 2020 -2021)
Step 4: Construction (48-60 months; 2022-2023)

The Feasibility Study considered four alternatives for technical valuation: 1

February 28, 2020


Alternative 2A: Godwin Drive extended to existing Route 28 south of Bull Run Alternative 2B: Godwin Drive extended to existing Route 28 north of Bull Run Alternative 4: Widening Route 28 on existing alignment between Liberia Avenue and the Fairfax County Line

Alternative 9: Euclid Avenue extension north to Route 28 near Bull Run and south to the Sudley Road/Route 234 intersection

These four alternatives were evaluated using the following criteria project cost (estimated/planning level costs), project benefits, environmental impacts (initial assessment), and socio-economic / right of way impacts. Alternative 2B emerged as the highest ranked alternative (feasibility study result/product).

Threatened Sites: Bull Run Regional Park, Blackburn’s Ford Battlefield, 1st Manassas (Bull Run) Battlefield

2


BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Minimize (preferably eliminate) impacts on Bull Run Regional Park; specifically

    impacts on historical and cultural sites, and on Bull Run Occoquan Trail (BROT) and

    access points

  • Ensure no impacts on Blackburn’s Ford Battlefield, including existing earthwork

    fortifications

  • Ensure no impacts on 1st Manassas (Bull run) Battlefield

    Status Summary:
    Prince William County Department of Transportation in partnership with the Virginia Department of Transportation initiated and environmental assessment study under the provisions of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) in the spring of 2018, with Parsons selected as the consultant to conduct the study. Options from the Feasibility Study under consideration are 2A, 2B and 4 (Option 9 was deemed to be not technically feasible).

    PWC DOT conducted Environmental Assessment Public Meeting #1 on 5 December (PWC) and 6 December (Fairfax County) 2018 at which an Environmental Assessment timeline was presented:

    o Scoping and Data Collection (ongoing)

    o Final Decision on Environmental Assessment by FHWA Winter 2019

    At the Prince William County Department of Transportation Technical Committee meeting conducted September 19, 2019 Parsons provided an update on the Route 28 Corridor Environmental Assessment (EA). Key points from the presentation:

  • Result of EA will be either a Finding of No Significant Impacts (FONSI), or a determination that an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is necessary

  • Cultural Resources Section 106 consultation initiated with Virginia DHR o Phase I Architectural Survey (by Dovetail Cultural Resources Group)

    identified 102 above ground resources that will be 50 years old by 2024) within the APE

    Four (4) post WWII era neighborhoods recommended as not eligible for National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) Ninety-three (93) other individual buildings - recommended as not eligible for HRHP

    Mitchells Ford Entrenchments, previously listed in NRHP in 1989

    retain sufficient integrity should remain listed on NRHP
    o Civil War Battlefields Assessment (by Dovetail Cultural Resources Group)

    identified four battlefields within the APE. (Based on the battlefield Study Areas described in the American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP) July

o Army COE permit required for alternatives impacting streams, wetlands, etc. - coordination with Army Corps of Engineers is ongoing, expect decision regarding COE permitting by March 2019

o Alternatives Refinement / Public Information Meeting Spring 2019 o Environmental Assessment Public Hearing Fall 2019

3


2009 report, and the potential National Register (PotNR) boundaries developed by the ABPP)

Blackburn’s Ford Battlefield areas within the APE - assumed to be eligible for NRHP and will be treated as historic property, with the exclusion of several areas that have lost integrity due to disturbance and development.

  • Existing VDOT right of way for Old Centreville Road/Ordway Road crossing of Bull Run

  • Existing VDOT right of way for Route 28

  • Commercial areas located on either side of Route 28 north of

    Orchard Bridge Drive

  • Townhomes on Charnwood Court

  • Approximately 24 acres of Orchard Bridge development

    First Manassas (Bull Run) Battlefield areas within the APE - assumed to be eligible for NRHP and will be treated as historic property, with the exclusion of several areas that have lost integrity due to disturbance and development.

Same as above

  • Survey of waters and use of wetlands - PE includes suitable habitat for a three

    threatened or endangered species; additional surveys and assessments are

    underway to determine any occurrences

  • Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act of 1966 (prohibits the use of

    federal highway funds for projects that adversely impact publicly owned parks and historic sites unless there is no feasible alternative to the use of such land)

    o Applicability to be determined based on funding for corridor improvements (PWC $200 million transportation bond initiative on ballot for November 5, 2019 election)

  • Refinement of Alternatives
    o Alternative 2A alignment shifted south to avoid Blackburn’s Ford

    Entrenchments and Bull Run Regional Park and to minimize impact to wetlands area

    Residential areas directly impacted

    • Charnwood Court townhome complex

    • Neighborhood playground on north side of Somersworth Drive

o Alternative 2B alignment shifted to overlap with the existing right-of-way along Ordway Road (Old Centreville Road), cross Bull Run at existing bridge and connect to Rt 28 north of Bull Run, minimizing impacts on Bull Run Regional Park and the Blackburn’s Ford and First Manassas (Bull Run) Battlefields

On October 9, 2019 (6:30 pm) PWC hosted a Public Meeting that provided an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Alternatives. During this meeting Parsons and PWC DoT provided an EA update similar to the update provided at the September 19, 2019 Technical Committee meeting, and Supervisor Nohe and PWC DoT Planner Belita provided updates from the County’s perspective and answered attendee questions. Most questions

4


were from home and business owners along the alternatives under consideration, and involved concerns such as drainage, flooding, increased traffic through residential neighborhoods, and impacts on businesses along Rt 28. As design work had not yet begun, answers could not be provided but concerns were recorded so they could be addressed in follow-on planning.

Parties Involved.
NVTA
Manassas Park (Yorkshire District)
City of Manassas
Prince William County Historical Commission NOVA Parks
ABT (CWT)
BRCWRT

Completed Actions.

  • PWC DOT conducted Environmental Assessment Public Meeting #1 on 5 December (PWC) and 6 December (Fairfax County) 2018, and solicited public comments due no later than Jan 10, 2019

  • BRCWRT Comments submitted December 25, 2018 (info@route28study.com)

o In recognition of the existing historical and cultural resources, waterways and wetlands that exist in the Route 28 corridor, recommend the following be added at the end of the goal statement, “........., without negatively affecting historical, cultural and archaeological resources and sites and/or wetlands in the project area.”

o Alternative 2B would significantly threaten the historic character of the Bull Run Regional Park and would significantly degrade the integrity of the quality of the visitor experience, as well as the area’s scenic and historic viewshed. Moreover, by crossing Bull Run Regional Park, Alternative 2B threatens prehistoric and historic archaeological resources that may be present in the path of this proposed alternative.

o Alternative 2B would have a significant negative impact on significant acreage within Bull Run Regional Park associated with the Battle of Blackburn’s Ford and the Battle of First Manassas/Bull Run. The Battle of Blackburn’s Ford, fought on June 18, 1861 and one of the first notable engagements of the Civil War with 151 estimated casualties, preceded the first major land battle of the Civil War, the Battle of First Manassas/Bull Run

fought on July 21, 1861. The acreage through which the northern part of Alternative 2B would cut is located well within the “core” battlefield boundary of both battles as determined by the federal Civil War Sites Advisory Commission (CWSAC) and its Report on the Nation’s Civil War Battlefields.

o Alternative 2A would have a significant negative impact on the Battle of Blackburn’s Ford core battlefield area, and specifically the extant confederate

5


earthworks located north of and overlooking Bull Run on the northern edge

of the core battlefield boundary.
o Any changes to the existing Route 28 bridge crossing over Bull Run Creek

could negatively impact the existing vehicular access from southbound Route 28 to the small parking area and the Bull Run Occoquan Trail, Blackburn’s Ford and the Civil War Trails signs. The 19-mile Bull Run Occoquan Trail has only five vehicular access points, and this is the only one in this vicinity

o Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act of 1966 prohibits the use of federal highway funds for projects that adversely impact publicly

owned parks and historic sites unless there is no feasible alternative to the use of such land. Insofar as the Route 28 Corridor Feasibility Study presented a number of feasible options, it would seem that this statutory criteria cannot be satisfied.

o For all of the reasons noted above, the Bull Run Civil War Round Table strongly recommends Alternative 4 as the preferred option among the three alternatives (2A, 2B, 4) currently under consideration.

BRCWRT representative (Blake Myers) attended September 19, 2019 PWC DoT Technical Committee Meeting where Parson Transportation Group, Inc. presented an Environmental Assessment Update.

o Received, as designated consulting party, copy of two reports completed as part of Section 106 consultation process with Virginia DHR, Phase I Architectural Survey, and Assessment of Battlefields (Dovetail Cultural Resources Group) reviewed reports and determined no discrepancies or issues with report contents

BRCWRT representatives (Blake Myers, Kim Brace) attended October 9, 2019 Public

Meeting hosted by PWC DoT at Yorkshire Elementary School during which DoT and Parsons provided an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Alternatives Update.

Planned Actions/Activities. BRCWRT

o Submit, as appropriate, a request for Consulting Party status in coordination with PWC DOT & Parsons

o Maintain communications and coordinate actions with NOVA Parks (Paul Gilbert, Director, and Michael DePue, Land Manager)

o Continue to attend relevant PWC DOT and public meetings, and submit, as appropriate, BRCWRT comments and information as input into the Route 28 Project

6


Ox Hill Battlefield Park (Battlefield Monuments), Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA)

Background. The long-awaited installation of the Union and Confederate soldiers’ monuments (Ox Hill and Chantilly) at Ox Hill Battlefield Park, and the previously announced dedication ceremony scheduled for September 9, 2017 were “postponed indefinitely” by Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA) officials on July 11, 2017.

Threatened Site: Ox Hill (Chantilly) Battlefield

BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Install the Ox Hill and Chantilly monuments in accordance with the Ox Hill

    Battlefield Park General Management Plan and Conceptual Development Plan that

    was approved in January 2005

  • Adequate maintenance, sustainment and upgrade/replacement (as needed) of the

    Ox Hill Battlefield Park infrastructure

  • Ox Battlefield Park marketed and promoted by Fairfax County as a County historical

    tourism destination

    Status Summary:
    Two plus years of BRCWRT ‘s efforts to work collaboratively with the FCPA and Park Authority Board to install these monuments have been unsuccessful and extremely frustrating.

    BRCWRT representatives attended the following FCPA meetings to monitor Park Authority Board discussions and actions regarding the monuments, and to speak during the public comment segments of Board meetings.

o October 10, 2018 FCPA Committee of the Whole (COW) meeting
o December 12, 2018 COW meeting and the follow on Park Authority Board meeting,

speaking during the meeting’s public comment segment
o January 9, 2019 COW meeting and the follow on Park Authority Board meeting,

speaking during the meeting’s public comment segment
o January 23, 2019 Park Authority Board meeting, speaking during the meeting’s

public comment segment

During the January 23, 2019 Park Authority Board meeting, the Board voted to approve the recommendation of the Executive Director:

The Park Authority Executive Director recommends to not install the monuments in their current form; and recommends that the Park Authority Board establish a subcommittee to work on the disposition of the monuments, as discussed by the Committee of the Whole on January 9, 2019.

No other action was taken by FCPA or the Park Authority Board during 2019.

7


On November 13, 2019 Blake Myers and Ed Wenzel attended the Park Authority Board meeting, and Blake spoke during the public comment segment of the meeting. Blake’s remarks addressed the fact that Chairman Bouie and the Board had not acknowledged receipt of BRCWRT’s letter of July 30, 2019, nor he follow-up email of October 8, 2019, nor had responded to any of our requests. The remarks concluded as follows:

We again request; 1) acknowledgement of receipt of our July 30, 2019 letter and 2) a response to our request that the Board: a) clearly identify the specific wording and/or inscriptions on the monuments that it deems inappropriate, and b) establish the subcommittee to resolve the specific wording and/or inscriptions deemed to be inappropriate and to complete the disposition (installation) of the monuments. We would appreciate a response tonight.

If the Park Authority Board does not intend to take any further action regarding the monuments or the subcommittee, we ask that you state that intent - - in which case, we will no longer bother you with this issue, but will pursue it via other options.

At the conclusion of his remarks, Blake asked Chairman Bouie if the Board intended any action. Chairman Bouie responded that they did and promised to ‘get back’ to us.

On January 15, 2020 BRCWRT members (Mark Trbovich, Blake Myers, Ed Wenzel) received via e-mail, a letter from Park Authority Board Chairman William G. (Bill) Bouie acknowledging receipt of BRCWRT’s letter dated July 31, 2019, indicating his anticipation “that the sub-committee will meet and begin discussions on next steps related to the memorials/monuments in the early half of 2020”, and a reminder of the One Fairfax Policy ‘lens’ through which “the sub-committee will be asked to review and make recommendations for next steps regarding the memorials/monuments.”

BRCWRT President Mark Whitenton responded to Mr. Bouie on January 27, 2020; acknowledging receipt of his letter of January 15, 2020 in response to our July 31, 2019 letter regarding the Ox Hill Battlefield Park monuments. The response:

  • Noted BRCWRT’s encouragement by Mr. Bouie’s anticipation of the subcommittee meetings and discussions and our desire to participate in those meetings and discussions

  • Expressed BRCWRT ‘s interest in the specific charter/scope-of-work of the subcommittee and the appointment of the community members to serve on the subcommittee and requested to be kept informed on both matters

  • Urged Mr. Bouie to appoint Ed Wenzel and Blake Myers to serve on the subcommittee, consistent with Mr. Bouie’s discussions with both gentlemen on January 9, 2019.

    As a result of the continuing frustration experienced in attempting to work with the FCPA and Park Authority Board on this issue BRCWRT sent letters, signed by BRCWRT President Mark Whitenton, to each member of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors on January 21, 2020. The letters included the following;

8


The BRCWRT requests your support to correct the improper actions of the Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA) and the Park Authority Board (hereafter Board) regarding their failure to complete the approved Ox Hill Battlefield Park General Management Plan and Conceptual Development Plan. That Plan, approved by the Board in January 2005, includes two monuments, Chantilly and Ox Hill. These monuments were designed as integral components of the Park and to commemorate the soldiers who fought at Ox Hill. Produced in 2016 at Fairfax County expense, the monuments have yet to be installed as called for in the approved Plan and remain in storage at an undisclosed location. The Chantilly and Ox Hill monuments are typical of monuments located in battlefield parks throughout the United States, are balanced and historically accurate, and complement the existing Park monuments commemorating Union Generals Kearny and Stevens, both of whom were killed during the battle.

Following more than two years of BRCWRT efforts to work collaboratively with FCPA, the Board voted (with one abstention) during their January 23, 2019 meeting to approve the Executive Director’s recommendation, to wit “The Park Authority Executive Director recommends to not install the monuments in their current form; and recommends that the Park Authority Board establish a subcommittee to work on the disposition of the monuments, as discussed by the Committee of the Whole on January 9, 2019.”

During the two-plus year period preceding the Board’s January 23, 2019 vote the FCPA and the Board publicly stated their intent to work with BRCWRT to identify and resolve issues regarding the monuments, but did not follow through on their commitment to do so and have misled the BRCWRT with respect to their intentions and actions. Additionally, to date the FCPA and the Board have neither fully established nor convened the subcommittee called for in the Board’s January 23, 2019 vote, and have not responded to multiple BRCWRT inquiries and offers of assistance.

We request that the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors direct the Park Authority Board to: 1) clearly identify the specific wording and/or inscriptions on the monuments that it deems inappropriate; 2) fully establish and convene the subcommittee to resolve the specific wording and/or inscriptions deemed inappropriate; 3) complete the disposition (installation) of the monuments in accordance with the Ox Hill Battlefield Park General Management Plan and Conceptual Development Plan that was approved in January 2005.

Parties Involved.
FCPA
BRCWRT
Kearny-Stevens Monuments Trustees

Completed Actions.
July 30, 2019 letter from BRCWRT and Kearny-Stevens Monuments Trustees to

William G. Bouie, Chair Park Authority Board (cc - Park Authority Board members, Fairfax County Supervisors, FCPA Executive Director, Chairman Fairfax County History Commission), BRCWRT respectfully requested “that the Board: 1) clearly identify the specific wording and/or inscriptions on the monuments that it deems inappropriate, and 2) establish the subcommittee to resolve the specific wording

9


and/or inscriptions deemed to be inappropriate and to complete the disposition

(installation) of the monuments.”

  • October 8, 2019 email to Park Authority Chairman William Bouie, BRCWRT

    requested 1) acknowledgement of receipt of this email, 2) acknowledgement of receipt of our July 30, 2019 letter and 3) a response to our initial request that the Board: a) clearly identify the specific wording and/or inscriptions on the monuments that it deems inappropriate, and b) establish the subcommittee to resolve the specific wording and/or inscriptions deemed to be inappropriate and to complete the disposition (installation) of the monuments. As of October 18, 2019 BRCWRT has received no response from Chairman Bouie.

  • November 13, 2019 Blake Myers and Ed Wenzel attended the Park Authority Board meeting, and Blake spoke during the public comment segment of the meeting. Blake’s remarks addressed the fact that Chairman Bouie and the Board had not acknowledged receipt of our letter of July 30, 2019, nor our follow-up email of October 8, 2019, nor had responded to our requests. At the conclusion of his remarks, Blake asked Chairman Bouie if the Board intended any action. Chairman Bouie responded that they did and promised to ‘get back’ to us.

  • The continuing frustration with the FCPA and Park Authority Board on this matter led BRCWRT to request intervention by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors. In identical, individual letters mailed on January 21, 2020 to each District Supervisor and to the Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, BRCRT requested the following; “We request that the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors direct the Park Authority Board to: 1) clearly identify the specific wording and/or inscriptions on the monuments that it deems inappropriate; 2) fully establish and convene the subcommittee to resolve the specific wording and/or inscriptions deemed inappropriate; 3) complete the disposition (installation) of the monuments in accordance with the Ox Hill Battlefield Park General Management Plan and Conceptual Development Plan that was approved in January 2005.

  • On January 15, 2020 BRCWRT members Mark Trbovich, Blake Myers and Ed Wenzel received via e-mail, a letter from Park Authority Board Chairman William G. (Bill) Bouie acknowledging receipt of BRCWRT’s letter dated July 31, 2019, indicating his anticipation “that the sub-committee will meet and begin discussions on next steps related to the memorials/monuments in the early half of 2020”, and a reminder of the One Fairfax Policy ‘lens’ through which “the sub-committee will be asked to review and make recommendations for next steps regarding the memorials/monuments.”

  • BRCWRT President Mark Whitenton responded to Mr. Bouie on January 24, 2020; acknowledging receipt of his letter of January 15, 2020 in response to our July 31, 2019 letter regarding the Ox Hill Battlefield Park monuments. This letter noted BRCWRT’s encouragement by Mr. Bouie’s anticipation of the subcommittee meetings and discussions and our desire to participate in those meetings and discussions. The letter expressed BRCWRT ‘s interest in the specific charter/scope- of-work of the subcommittee and the appointment of the community members to serve on the subcommittee and requested to be kept informed on both matters. The letter also urged Mr. Bouie to appoint Ed Wenzel and Blake Myers to serve on the

10


subcommittee, consistent with Mr. Bouie’s discussions with both gentlemen on January 9, 2019.

Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Maintain communication with FCPA Executive Director

  • Continue to monitor subcommittee formation, activities, and participate as

    members (once appointed)

  • Provide appropriate representation on the subcommittee

  • Follow up with selected Fairfax County Supervisors to schedule office visits and

    discussion

  • Work in collaboration with other like-minded groups and the FCHC to bring focus to

    Ox Hill Battlefield Park as an historic site, a place of learning and an attraction for

    tourists and tourism dollars.

  • Collaborate with the Kearney-Stevens Monuments Trustees in stressing to FCPA the

    need to properly maintain Ox Hill Battlefield Park current issues include overgrown brush, deteriorated fence rails and fence lines (appear to be the same ones initially installed in 2008), kiosk and marker maintenance (rust, dirt), etc.

    Farr’s Fort (Redoubt on GMU Fairfax Campus)

    Background. Local historians have long known of the significance of the area surrounding the Ox Road (Route 123)/Braddock Road (Route 620) intersection (Farr’s Cross Roads). Several studies, including the Fairfax County Civil War Sites Inventory (prepared by John Milner Associates, Inc. in 2002), have documented the existence of Civil War-era redoubts, earthworks and camps in the areas surrounding the intersection.

    Of particular interest is a redoubt and set of earthworks constructed by Col. Robert Rodes’ 5th Alabama (Ewell’s Brigade) in July 1861, prior to Battle of 1st Manassas/Bull Run, located on George Mason University (GMU), Fairfax Campus. The site is in a small wooded area on the northeast quadrant of the Ox Road/Braddock Road intersection.

    The site is documented in the Fairfax County Civil War Sites Inventory completed by John Milner Associates, Inc. for the Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA) in 2002, and is included (44FX185) in the Fairfax County and Virginia historic site databases. Brian Corle, while a student at George Mason University (GMU), completed the Archeological Assessment of Site 44FX185, The Earthwork at Farrs Crossroads Fairfax County, Virginia (DHR File Number 2008-1541) in 2008.

    In 2014 and 2016, remnants of the corduroy road that ran between Fairfax Court House and Fairfax Station were discovered during road construction projects along the section of Ox Road bordering the University Mall. BRCWRT supported the Friends of the Historic Courthouse in discussions to establish a site with appropriate signage describing the history and location of the Corduroy Road (Ox Road) - potential site locations included

11


University Mall and GMU (as part of redoubt site). An initial dendrochronology assessment of logs recovered from the excavated corduroy road site indicated that the logs did not have a sufficient number of growth rings to accurately date them. While the inability to accurately date these recovered logs is unfortunate, they still present a terrific opportunity to tell and depict the history and story of the corduroying of Ox Road (before, during and after the Civil War period). There has been no progress to date on the Corduroy Road initiative.

Threatened Sites: Farr’s Crossroads, Civil War fortification (Farr’s Fort) constructed in 1861 by Confederate forces and used by both Confederate and Federal forces throughout the war.

BRCWRT Objectives:
Preserve and interpret the Farr’s Cross Roads Site, including:

o Farr’sFortRedoubt
o Farr’s Cross Roads History o CorduroyRoad

Develop and implement a site treatment plan

Status Summary:
In 2016 BRCWRT began discussions with GMU’s Department of History and Art History about Farr’s Crossroads and its history and relevance to local, state and national history. This discussion led to BRCWRT members conducting, beginning in the Fall of 2016, an annual on-site class/tour for the Department’s Civil War and Reconstruction course students on the history of the site and Farr’s Fort redoubt. The success of these classes and the attendant interest generated within the GMU scholastic community led to discussions concerning preserving and interpreting the site.

In 2018 a collaborative effort involving BRCWRT, GMU’s Department of History and Art History and Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science (GGS), and professional archaeologists produced a preliminary preservation and interpretive plan and concept for the site. The concept was presented to a select group of GMU administrative staff leaders on September 14, 2018. These leaders understood the historical significance of the redoubt and Farr’s Cross Roads, and expressed interest in pursuing the concept of preserving and interpreting the site. No definitive decisions were reached but follow up actions to mature the concept and conduct further discussions were identified, among them the removal of four trees threatening redoubt structural integrity, and to verify/document the historical significance of Farr’s Fort.

In October 2018, we initiated the process for submission of Farr’s Fort for inclusion on the Virginia Landmarks Register, and potentially the NPS National Register of Historic Places. The Farr’s Fort registration information packet was completed based on historical research conducted by BRCWRT members Brain McEnany, Jim Lewis and Blake Myers, and information in The Archaeological Assessment of Site 44FX0185 The Earthworks at Farr’s Crossroads Fairfax County, Virginia completed by Brian Corle in 2008. The packet was completed and submitted to DHR’s Northern Regional Preservation Office in Stevens City

12


on January 25, 2019. The Virginia State Review Board determined that the site is potentially eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion C, Military History on March 21, 2019. The next step, under discussion with GMU, is completion of the National Register of Historic Places application.

On June,5, 2019 Dr. Brian Platt, Chair of the Department of History and Art History, and Blake Myers, BRCWRT, met with Carol Kissal, Senior VP for Administration and Finance and Frank Strike, VP Facilities to discuss the Farr’s Fort site and the potential to preserve and interpret the site. Carol Kissall made the decision that GMU would preserve and interpret the site under the purview of Frank Strike, VP Facilities, with two components to the project:

  • A near-term component to preserve and interpret Farr’s Fort

  • A long -term component to include the broad historical aspects of the Farr’s Cross

    roads and Farr’s Fort site in the development of the Mason Master Plan, scheduled to begin in 2019/2020

    On June 25, 2019 the core preservation team (Dr. Brian Platt, Erich Miller, Chris Sperling, Blake Myers, Jim Lewis and Brian McEnany) conducted a site visit, followed by a review and discussion of the Initial Draft Treatment Plan to guide the preservation and interpretation of the site. Based n this discussion the Plan was updated and revised on June 27, 2019

    On September 24, 2019 Dr. Bran Platt and Blake Myers met with Frank Strike, VP Facilities, and Doug Lipscomb, Assistant VP Campus Planning, to discuss implementation of the Draft Farr’s Fort Treatment Plan. Doug informed us that he had discussed the site and treatment plan with Adrienne Birge-Wilson at Virginia DHR, and DHR strongly recommended that a site archaeological assessment be done prior to any site disturbance, including preservation or interpretation project work. As GMU has no archaeological department, Doug’s recommendation was to add a site archaeological assessment to the cultural resources assessment planned as part of the development of the Mason Master Plan, due to begin this Fall (2019).

    On November 18, 2019 Blake Myers received an email from Doug Lipscomb, GMU Assistant Vice President Planning and Design, with the following information, “Due to other causes as of last week we are currently not proceeding with the parking lot project which would have funded the archaeological assessment. Therefore, we have no source to fund the archaeological assessment at this time. Depending upon funding level we may incorporate this effort into our Master Plan which we will be initiating in the relative near term.” Follow up information provided by Doug Lipscomb on Nov 19, 2019 included treh following: As per the Virginia Department of Historic Resources we are directed not to proceed with any modifications, improvements, etc. associated with the Fort Farr area until we have completed an archaeological assessment.......The parking study and associated archaeological assessment is not proceeding at this time. It is possible if funding allows that this will be incorporated into the Master Plan - the scope of which I am currently negotiating with a consultant. I have no other information at this time on the subject.

13


Communications from November 2019 through February 2020 between BRCWRT, Virginia DHR and GMU brought to light some confusion and misinterpretation of information, guidance and recommendations DHR had provided to GMU.

On February 20, 2020 a teleconference was conducted to discuss preserving and interpreting Farr’s Fort and the Farr’s Crossroads Site. Teleconference participants were; Frank Strike (VP Facilities), Deniz Callahan, (Campus Planning Staff) Dr. Brain Platt (Chair, Department of History and Art History), Blake Myers (BRCWRT), Adrienne Birge-Wilson (Va. DHR), Roger Kirchen (Va. DHR), and Jennifer Bellville-Marrion (Va. DHR). The objective of the teleconference was to get all the key players (GMU, DHR, BRCWRT) in one place to discuss the relevant issues and concerns, share information and get us all on the same page, and determine a way forward - all of which was accomplished.

Frank Strike informed participants that the 21-month Mason Master Plan development process was initiated in January 2020. The process consists of two phases; Phase I (ongoing) is assessment, data collection and analysis, and Phase II will consist of developing infrastructure plans addressing archaeological/cultural assessments, staff needs, student needs and facilities. GMU, while supportive of the preserving and interpreting the site, discussed issues of concern from GMU's perspective - determining specific preservation and interpretation actions that can potentially be done, identifying & accounting for any relevant restrictions (e.g., ADA accessibility), and identifying the ultimate resources (cost, people/expertise, etc.) required for the project.

The teleconference resulted in an agreed upon way forward for the near-term preservation component that includes; 1) conducting an initial assessment of possible preservation and interpretation actions, 2) clarifying any specific restrictions related to ADA accessibility, etc. and 3) once we have information based on these two actions, re-convene to discuss and determine the next steps. Actions currently planned and/or on-going include; 1) a broad archaeological site assessment to clarify possible preservation and interpretation options, 2) an onsite visit/assessment by DHR representatives, 3) assessing specific ADA accessibility requirements and 4) a follow on meeting/teleconference to review information and revise/update plans, as appropriate.

Discussions with Adrienne Birge-Wilson (V. DHR) on February 26, 2020 confirmed a Farr’s Fort site visit by Adrienne and Jennifer Bellville-Marrion on Wednesday March 12, 2020. Dr.Platt, Blake Myers and Chris Sperling (FCPA Archaeologist) to meet & accompany Adrienne and Jennifer on site visit.

BRCWRT is continuing its support of GMU’s Department of History and Art History by providing an annual Farr’s Crossroads / Farr’s Fort on-site class for students in Professor Christopher’s Hamner’s HIST 373 Civil War and Reconstruction class. This on-site class, planned and conducted by BRCWRT members Brian McEnany, Jim Lewis and Blake Myers, began in 2016 and is typically conducted in the fall of each year.

Parties Involved.
GMU Department of History and Art History

14


GMU Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science (GGS) GMU Facilities Department
GMU Grounds Department
BRCWRT

Fairfax County Park Authority Virginia DHR

Completed Actions.
BRCWRT Classes/Tours of Farr’s Cross Roads Redoubt

• •

7 November 2016 - Brian McEnany, Jim Lewis and Blake Myers conducted Farr’s Cross Roads Site tour and class for Professor Christopher Hamner’s Civil War and Reconstruction class (attendees - fourteen students, Brian Platt, Christopher Hamner).

30 October 2017 - Brian McEnany, Jim Lewis and Blake Myers conducted Farr’s Cross Roads Site tour and class for Professor Christopher Hamner’s Civil War and Reconstruction class (attendees - twenty-four students, Alex Hughes [2016 BRCWRT Scholarship Awardee & current GMU student], Brian Platt, Christopher Hamner, and Ann Reynolds & Laura Powers from the Dean’s Office of Communications).

23 October 2018 Brian McEnany, Jim Lewis and Blake Myers conducted Farr’s Cross Roads Site tour and class for Professor Christopher Hamner’s Civil War and Reconstruction class (attendees included twenty-three GMU students, History Department Chair Brian Platt, Professor Christopher Hamner, and fifteen BRCWRT members).

Treatment Plan Development

  • BRWCRT research; October December 2017

  • January 10, 2018 meeting with Brain Platt, Chair of GMU History Department to

    discuss research findings, preservation guidelines, preservation team requirements and resources, applicable state requirements and policies, funding sources, etc. and plan to move forward with presentation to appropriate GMU decision makers

  • Preservation ‘core team’ preliminary assessment conducted March 2, 2018 o Core Team members:

    Team Leader: Dr. Brain Platt, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of History and Art History
    Archaeologist: Joe Balicki, Commonwealth Heritage Group, Partner & Senior Archaeologist; Christopher Sperling, FCPA Senior Archaeologist & GMU graduate (advisory role)

    Arborist: Randall Teets, GMU Grounds Shop
    Site Preparation, Stabilization & Maintenance: Archie Nesbitt, GMU Grounds Shop Supervisor
    BRCWRT - Research and historical documentation, Liaison with FCPA and Virginia DHR, Interpretive signs text and contents: Blake Myers, Brian McEnany, Jim Lewis

    o Developed preliminary treatment plan concept 15


Site stabilization, access and ‘debris clearance’

Site interpretation
o Preliminary Treatment Plan and Assessment completed on March 15, 2018

Preliminary cost estimate - $23,440.00
o Initial Draft Treatment Plan completed on June 27, 2019

Farr’s Fort inclusion in Virginia Landmarks Register, and potentially National Park Service National Register of Historic Places

  • Farr’s Fort information packet signed by GMU Senior Vice President Tom Calhoun on January 14, 2019

  • Farr’s Fort information packet submitted to Virginia DHR’s Northern Regional Preservation Office on January 25, 2019

  • The Virginia State Review Board determined that the site is potentially eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion C, Military History on March 21, 2019. The next step, under discussion with GMU, is completion of the National Register of Historic Places application.

    Planned Actions/Activities.

Continue coordination with GMU regarding incorporation of Farr’s Cross Roads and

Farr’s Fort historic site in development of the Mason Master Plan (2020)
o Archeological Assessment as part of Mason Master Plan development
o Fully develop site Treatment Plan to include specific actions necessary to

preserve and interpret the earthwork (tbd) o Obtain approval of Treatment Plan (tbd)
o Implement Treatment Plan (tbd)

Continue coordination with GMU regarding near-term preservation and interpretation project

o Mulched access path
o Interpretive marker at path entrance (Parking Lot K) o CWT marker at redoubt (Farr’s Fort)

Follow up actions from February 20, 2020 teleconference (GMU, BRCWRT, DHR) o Coordination with Chris Sperling and Joe Balicki (Blake)
o Follow up with Ruth Townsend re ADA Accessibility issue/questions (Dr.

Platt)
o Conduct site broad assessment (Chris and/or Joe)
o Conduct follow-up meeting to consider results of above actions o Revise/Update Plan/Way Forward as appropriate

  • Farr’s Fort Site visit on March 12, 2020 with Virginia DHR representatives Adrienne Birge-Wilson and Jennifer Bellville-Marrion, Dr.Platt, Chris Sperling and Blake Myers

  • Discussion and coordination with GMU regarding completion and submittal of a National Register of Historic Places application for Farr’s Fort

  • Continue to support GMU’s Department of History and Art History with an annual class/tour of the Farr’s Cross Roads site

16


Signal [Willcoxon] Hill

Background.
BRCWRT continues to work with
Prince William County’s (PWC) Historical Commission, Board of County Supervisors, Historic Preservation Division and Historic Preservation Foundation and the City of Manassas Park to preserve and interpret Signal (Willcoxon) Hill. The PWC Board of Supervisors received funds from Verizon as part of the use agreement for Signal Hill Park property used for the cellular communications tower installed in 2017.

Special Use Permit Verizon at Signal Hill Park:

  • The intent is to 1) use these funds to conduct a preservation study of the Signal (Willcoxon) Hill site, 2) link the Cayden Ridge walkway into the Signal Hill parking lot/memorial site, 3) preserve and interpret Signal (Willcoxon) Hill

  • Both the City of Manassas Park and the Prince William County Planning Office have included the preservation and interpretation of Signal (Willcoxon) Hill in their long range planning document

    Threatened Site: Signal (Willcoxon Hill)

    BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Conduct a Signal Hill Preservation Study

    o Site Management

    o Site Preservation and Interpretation

  • Develop and implement a Signal Hill Preservation and Interpretation Plan

  • Establish pedestrian access to Signal Hill by connecting the existing pathway to the

    Signal Hill parking area/Signal Corps monument site

    Status Summary:
    On September 20, 2018 BRCWRT representatives (Kim Brace and Blake Myers) met with
    Calvin O’Dell, Director Manassas Park Community Development, Jay Swisher, Manassas Park Parks Director and Michelle Barry, Manassas Park Planning and Zoning Administrator to discuss the status of funding for the preservation study of Signal (Willcoxon) Hill. There was clearly staff support for this initiative; however, to move forward requires getting the preservation of Signal Hill incorporated into the City of Manassas Park’s strategic planning document and its Capital Improvement Plan. Calvin O’Oell indicated the following items would be useful to the city planning staff in developing the requisite inputs for both documents:

17


  • PWC strategic plan wording regarding Signal Hill and its preservation (for use in developing similar language for Manassas Park’s strategic planning document)

  • Signal Hill preservation and interpretation vision/concept

  • Example of a Preservation Study (Bristoe Station and Kettle Run Battlefields

    Preservation Study)

    BRCWRT provided the following documents to Calvin O’Dell, Director Manassas Park Community Development on October 9 & 10, 2018:

  • PWC Historical Commission strategic plan wording regarding Signal Hill, its historical significance and preservation objectives

  • Digital link (PWC Webpage) to Bristoe Station and Kettle Run Battlefields Preservation Study

  • A Signal Hill Preservation and Interpretation Concept

    During their May 7, 2019 meeting, the Prince William Board of County Supervisors approved a Boundary Line adjustment between PWC and the City of Manassas Park that affects ownership of Signal Hill Park, Historic Signal Hill and Generals Ridge Golf Course....all of which transfer to the ownership of the City of Manassas Park.

    During their December 10, 2019 Prince William Board of County Supervisors meeting, the Board approved the transfer of the $10,000.00 proffer for the purposes of historic preservation and/or enhancements to Signal Hill (076-0016) to PWC’s Historic Preservation Foundation. The Board also approved the Historic Foundation’s Annual Work Plan for 2020, which includes a Signal Hill Cultural Resource Identification Study. This study is described in the Work Plan as “The completion of a cultural resource study to identify cultural resources and interpretive themes for the Civil War era site. Project to be completed in conjunction with the Prince William County Planning Office and the City of Manassas Park, Parks and Recreation Department.

    As of February 15, 2020, the proffer funds have not been transferred to the PWC Historic Foundation; however, the PWC Planning Office expects the transfer to be accomplished by May 2020.

    On February 18, 2020 Kim Brace attended the PWC Planning Commission Public Meeting regarding, among other items, Comprehensive Plan Amendment, CPA #20-01:

  • Designate approximately 191 acres of Blooms Park and approximately 105 acres of land known as Signal Hill Park, Historic Signal Hill, Parcel D, Section 2, Roseberry Subdivision and an abutting portion of Blooms Road right-of-way, addressed as 9300 Signal View Drive, Manassas, VA 20111, as recreation

  • Designate the approximately 20 acres of land known as Residue of the Catholic Diocese of Arlington, located southwest of the Digital Drive and Manassas Drive intersection in Manassas Park, as Private Institution.

    And Rezoning Request, RZ #20-012:

Blooms Park, addressed as 9701 Manassas Drive, Manassas Park, VA 20111,

containing approximately 292 acres, from PUD, Planned unit development district

18


and A-1, Agriculture to PF, Public facilities district for use as a voter registration

office, library and public park,
.Signal Hill Park, Historic Signal Hill, Parcel D, Section 2, Roseberry Subdivision and

an abutting portion of Blooms Road right-of-way, addressed as 9300 Signal View Drive, Manassas, VA 20111, containing approximately 105 acres from A-1, agriculture district to PF, Public facilities district for use as a public park.

[A potential issue exists with proposed actions regarding the Bloom’s Park property is it includes in the north western most section of the park (bottom of the hill) sites where the phase 1 or 2 report on the park indicated troop encampment sites for the units guarding Signal Hill, with a portion of that site extending onto the Diocese. Manassas Park should conduct a Phase 1 & Phase 2 study on the Diocese property before they turn that specific area into a parking lot.]

The Planning Commission voted to recommend approval of CPA #20-01 and Rezoning Request RZ #20-012.

Parties Involved.
City of Manassas Park
Prince William County Planning Office
Prince William County Historical Commission
Prince William County Historic Preservation Division Prince William County Historic Preservation Foundation BRCWRT

Completed Actions/Activities.

BRCWRT provided the following to Calvin O’Dell, Director Manassas Park Community Development on October 9 & 10, 2018:

o PWC Historical Commission strategic plan wording regarding Signal Hill, its historical significance and preservation objectives

o Digital link (PWC Webpage) to Bristoe Station and Kettle Run Battlefields Preservation Study

o Signal Hill Preservation and Interpretation Concept

  • Blake Myers met with PWC Archaeologist Justin Patton (PWC Planning Office)on January 29, 2019; discussed Signal Hill and confirmed that the PWC Planning Office has received the proffered $10,000.00 for preservation and/or enhancement to Signal Hill.

  • Continued coordination, December 2019 Feb 2020, with Justin Patton to track transfer of proffer funds and site preservation activities.

  • Kim Brace attended February 18, 2020 Planning Commission Public Meeting and spoke about the issue concerning the Bloom’s Park property north-western-most section where the phase 1 & 2 report on the park indicated troop encampment sites

19


for the units guarding Signal Hill, with a portion of that site extending onto the Diocese property.

Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Continue to work with the PWC Historic Preservation Division, the PWC Historic

    Preservation Foundation, the PWC Historical Commission, the PWC Planning Office,

    and the City of Manassas Park to preserve and interpret Signal Hill

  • Meet with the City of Manassas Planner, Calvin O’Dell, to continue discussions

    regarding Signal Hill preservation and interpretation
    o Develop and implement a Signal Hill Preservation and Interpretation Plan

  • Coordinate with PWC Historic Preservation Foundation regarding planning for and conduct of Signal Hill Preservation Study

    o Site Management Plan

    o Site Preservation and Interpretation Plan

  • Conduct an on-site tour & history overview of Signal Hill for relevant partners in

    this project (tbd)

  • Work with the City of Manassas Park to provide pedestrian access to Signal Hill by

    connecting the existing pathway to the Signal Hill parking area/Signal Corps monument site

    Transform 66 Outside the Beltway Project

    Background. As part of a larger I-66 improvement project, Dynamic Tolling Express Lanes will be extended from the Capital Beltway to Gainesville.
    http://outside.transform66.org/

    Transforming I-66 by 2022; more than $3B in transportation improvements designed to:

  • Relieve congestion in all lanes

  • Provide for assert transit through Express Lanes

  • Move 2,000 to 4,000 more people per hour

  • Fund new buses and transit routes

  • Add 4,000 new park-and-ride spaces

  • Improve safety

    Project Overview:

  • Multi-modal improvements to 22.5 miles of I-66

  • Two Dynamic Tolling Express Lanes in each direction from I-495 to Gainesville

  • Three General Purpose Lanes in each direction

  • HOV and transit access to Express Lanes

  • Median Space reserved for future transit

  • Improved park-and-ride options with access to Express Lanes

  • Bike-pedestrian trail integrated with existing and planned trails

    Project segments

Segment 1 Gainesville to Route 234 Business to Route 29 in Centreville

20


  • Segment 2 Centreville to Route 28 to Route 50

  • Segment 3 Route 50 to Nutley Street to I-495

    Timeline

  • Start Up Activities, Jan - Mid 2017

  • Public Information Meetings, 12, 14 & 15 June 2017

  • Design Public Hearings, 13, 14, 16 November 2017

  • Begin construction and right-of-way acquisition, December 2017

  • Final Noise Study, Spring 2018

  • Route 28 Signalization, Summer 2020

  • Express Lanes open to traffic, December 2022

    FAM Construction, LLC, a partnership between Ferrovial Agroman US and Allan Myers VA Inc., is the design-build contractor for the I-66 Outside the Beltway Project.

    Threatened Sites: Manassas National Battlefield Park and Battlefield Sites

    BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Minimize impacts to Manassas National Battlefield Park and the Manassas

    Battlefields
    o MNBP viewsheds
    o Traffic noise and congestion o Roadway lighting

  • Complete Portici cultural landscape report

  • Ensure connectivity of BROT and MNBP trails at the site of the new I-66 bridge

    crossing Bull Run

    Status Summary:
    Project segment 1 (Gainesville to Centreville) design aspect that negatively impact the Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNB): Express Elevated Access Ramps (EARs) on both ends of Portici Plantation MNBP property bordering I-66, from Vandor Lane / Battleview Parkway intersection to Vandor Lane east of Virginia Welcome Center
    locally known as ‘Annie’s Dip’

  • View shed negatively impacted by EARs, and the removal of evergreen trees currently located between Vandor Lane and I-66 (widening of I-66 and increased median space)

  • Increased levels of Traffic noise that would result from the elevated ramps
    On January 17, 2019 VDOT issued executed MOA (without NPS/MNBP as signatory) for

    consulting party review and signature as a concurring party.

    On May 8, 2019 VODT/FA provided design plan updates to consulting parties for review. Comments submitted by the consulting parties based on their review of the plans provided highlighted the inability (based on the level of detail provided in the 60% design plans provided for Segment 1B) to assess design compliance with the stipulations included in the

21


January 2019 MOA (see MOA, pp 3-4). As of October 7, 2019 no additional consulting party meetings have been scheduled, and are not anticipated until the 90% design plans are provided for consulting party review later in 2019.

In a December 20, 2019 letter to VDOT (Mrs. Susan Shaw, Megaprojects Director, Northern Virginia District), MNBP Superintendent Bandon Bies requested that VDOT convene a meeting of consulting parties in January 2020 to discuss a number of outstanding and new issues concerning the I66 project segments impacting MNBP.

  • It has been more than a year since the MOA was signed (without NPS as a Signatory) in December 2018, and the last consulting party meeting was conducted on August 1, 2018

  • VDOT’s lack of follow up and transparency with multiple on-going issues identified by MNBP and other consulting parties is alarming

    MNBP and the NOVA trails community have identified an issue concerning the Bull Run Loop trail (BROT) (https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/vbwt/coastal-trail/cbr/) that crosses under updated I-66 bridge over Bull Run at the Prince William County - Fairfax County border. The ongoing bridge construction is, and the final construction may, result in blockage of the trail and its connection to the MNBP trail. NOVA Trails has mobilized a crowd to make it clear to VDOT and Express Mobility Partners that the current trail blockage, required to enable new bridge construction, must be removed and the trail reopened when the I-66 bridge construction is completed.

    In a January 16, 2020 e-mail from Tom Heil, FAM Construction LLC Deputy Design Manager, announces a Consulting Party meeting on February 27, 2020 at 10:00 AM (subsequently changed in January 20, 2020 e-mail to March 4, 2020); meeting location is to be determined. The following information is be provided to for review and comment approximately two weeks prior to the meeting date:

    Elevated Access Ramp (EARs) bridge plans (second review), MOA Stipulation 1.A.1; Proposed aesthetic treatments for WB EARs ramp including color (second review), MOA Stipulation 1.A.2;
    Segment 1B West roadway plans including signing and marking plans, lighting plans, ITS plans (third review), MOA Stipulations 1.A.3, 1.A.4, 1.A.5, 1.A.6, and 1.A.7; EARs vegetative screening / landscape plan (first review), MOA Stipulation 1.A.8; and

    CP comment responses to CP comments made on second plan submission, MOA Stipulation 1.B.3, in June 2019.

    VDOT provided consulting parties Design Plans for review (CD) via US Mail; received on February 27, 2020. CP review comments are due to FAM on or before April 8, 2020.

Segment 1B West (portion of I66 from west of Balls Ford Park-and-Ride lot to east of Sudley Road); Specific portions relevant to MNBP vicinity of Vandor Lane

o Lighting Plans
o Signing and pavement marking plans

22


o ITS plans

  • WB EAR’s east of Sudley Road Bridge

  • Vegetative Screening Landscape Plan

  • CP Plan Review Comment Responses from May 2019 Plan set CP Review

    Parties Involved.
    VDOT - Northern Virginia District (4975 Alliance Drive, Fairfax Virginia 22033), Susan Shaw, P.E. (Megaprojects Director)
    National Park Service (NPS) / Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP), Brandon Bies (Superintendent)
    American Battlefield Trust (Civil War Trust) (ABT)
    Manassas Battlefield Trust (MBT)
    Bull Run Civil War Round Table (BRCWRT)
    Piedmont Environmental Council
    Central Virginia Battlefields Trust (CVBT)
    Prince William County (PWC) Planning Office
    Prince William Conservation Alliance
    NOVA Trails

    Completed Actions/Activities:

  • BRCWRT provided comments to final Draft MOA on November 14, 2018

  • BRCWRT participated in November 19, 2018 teleconference to discuss MOA

  • Subsequent to consultations with MNBP and other consulting parties, BRCWRT

    responded to VDOT regarding the executed MOA (January 17, 2019):

    While the Bull Run Civil War Round Table (BRCWRT) has no specific issues with the recitals or stipulations in the MOA, we are of the opinion that the National Park Service (NPS) / Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP) should be an MOA Signatory. The impacts of ATC 30 on MNBP are the basis for the adverse effect determination, the reason for the MOA, and several of the mitigation measures addressed in the MOA will require NPS/MNBP action in moving forward to mitigate the adverse effects identified. From a process perspective it seems shortsighted, inefficient and less than optimal to exclude NPS / MNBP as a Signatory to the MOA.

    BRCWRT desires to continue serving as a consulting party, but for the reason

    cited above declines to sign the MOA, in its current form, as a concurring party.

  • Reviewed and coordinated comments/input on the 60% Segment 1B design plans provided by VDOT in May 2019

    Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Review Feb 2020 Plan Designs provided by FAM and submit comments on or before

    April 8, 2020

  • Maintain communication and coordination with MNBP Superintendent, Brandon

    Bies

  • Coordinate actions with Manassas Battlefield Trust POC Christy Forman

23


  • Attend consulting party meetings next meeting scheduled for March 4, 2020

  • Submit, as appropriate, additional comments and information

  • Monitor developments

    Limb Pit Discovery at Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP)

    Background.
    During a planned MNBP utility excavation in October 2014, the archeologist monitoring the work recovered bone fragments from the project site, suggesting the presence of disarticulated human remains consistent with the use of the site as a field hospital, resulting in the recommendation for further archeological testing to confirm the interpretation and to determine the relationship among the archeological feature, artifacts, and human remains

    In October 2015, NPS archeologists and contract archeologists conducted further testing at the site and discovered two nearly intact sets of skeletal remains mingled with amputated limbs, and made the decision to conduct a program of data recovery to excavate the remains which were then transported to the NPS Museum Resource Center

    In April 2016, the NPS transferred the recovered remains to the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) for forensic analysis, resulting in findings that the remains were associated with Union casualties from the Second Battle of Manassas. The two sets of remains were determined to be Union soldiers from the New England area, and likely from upstate NY.

    The two sets of remains were transferred from NPS to The Army and Arlington National Cemetery on June 19, 2018

  • The remains were interred as ‘unknowns’ at Arlington National Cemetery on September 6, 2018 as part of the dedication ceremony for the new Arlington Millennium Section

  • Remains were wrapped in replica Union blankets and placed in a ‘toe-pincher’ wooden coffin constructed from the trunk of a 90-year old MNBP tree that fell during recent windstorm the wooden coffin was placed inside a modern military casket for interment

    Disposition and interpretation of limb pit and pit artifacts remain under discussion and are to-be-determined.

    BRCWRT Objectives:
    Historic interpretation of the limb pit and excavated limbs (using photographs and

    3-D models)
    Historical marker for cremated remains and the two soldiers’ remains re-interred at

    Arlington National Military Cemetery.

24


Status Summary:
The National Park Service and MNBP hosted a Section 106 consulting party meeting Monday, December 3, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. to focus on the disposition and interpretation of the limb pit, discovered limbs and bone fragments/pieces, and other artifacts

  • A representative from the Office of the Army General Counsel reviewed the current Army position regarding the limb pit remains

  • Dr. Doug Owsley, Smithsonian forensic archaeologist, provided an overview of limb pit discoveries to date and the site itself:

    • -  13 total sets of remains discovered
      2 sets of intact remains (remains interred in Arlington National Cemetery)
      4 sets of disturbed, broken, scattered remains (no medical value); disturbed by plowing, initial trench dig, etc.
      6 limbs (4 legs, 2 arms)
      1 other limb (item remains partially buried in pit)

    • -  Uniqueness of site is due to its location- on the battlefield and not in a general hospital and the surgery conducted was done within 24-36 hours after the battle

    • -  Presents a unique opportunity for public knowledge and historical interpretation within a true battlefield context

    • -  Medical and surgical procedures used indicate the work of a skilled surgeon

    • -  Analysis can determine region of country from which the amputated limbs

      originate and potentially the soldiers from which the limbs came

  • The limb pit discoveries are currently held by the Smithsonian, on loan from NPS

  • General consensus of consulting parties is to retain the limbs for further medical &

    DNA analysis

  • Army representative presented a potential compromise position, based on

    additional medical value analysis and assessment of limb pit remains

    The National Park Service and MNBP hosted a Section 106 consulting party meeting Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 1:00 p.m.

Limb assessment and recommendation paper provided by Doug Owsley and Kirin Bruwelheide on March 1, 2019

o Bones of seven archaeologically recovered limbs and one partial, amputated femur for curation to enable integrated historical and scientific research to produce information for interpretation and historical purposes (and potentially identification of soldiers)

Unique opportunity to better understand (and interpret) CW

battlefield surgical treatment and amputations
o Bones of four limbs and unmatched foot fragments damaged by backhoe

work in the limb pit to be considered for disposition by the Army
Majority of consulting parties concur with recommendation for NPS to retain the

limb bones with medical value for curation to inform historical understanding and interpretation

25


  • Army is undecided

  • NPS to draft proposal for consulting parties’ consideration that addresses:

o Retention of eight limbs by NPS for curation and further research
o Completing the excavation of the limb pit and recovery of any additional

limbs or bone fragments
o Reassess the damaged limbs based on additional discoveries that enhance

the value of any of the damaged limbs for curation purposes
o NPS to retain custody of limbs identified for curation
o NPS to determine, in coordination with the Army, disposition of limbs and

bone fragments not retained for curation

Received on September 6, 2019 a National Park Service (NPS) proposed amendment to the Memorandum of Agreement signed in June 2018, to address the disposition of amputated limbs discovered at Manassas National Battlefield Park and the in situ archeological resources located at the discovery site. The amendment reflects the discussions that occurred at the consulting party meetings held on December 3, 2018, and March 7, 2019. (Comments requested no later than Friday, September 20, 2019.)

  • Army non-concurred based on position that the proposed MOA Amendment did not convey how Army's concerns were taken into account; Army thinks that further consultation will allow the parties to reach agreement

  • Army requested to e-engage and continue with meaningful consultation on the final disposition of the remains at the conclusion of reasonable scientific studies and the path forward regarding the in-situ remains. What constituted a 'reasonable time period' and whether Army would consider a casketed burial instead of cremation in order to protect the remains were some of the unresolved issues being discussed in consultation.

    Consulting Party Meeting on October 31, 2019 - MNBP Superintendent Brandon Bies provided an overview of actions to date since re-initiating the NHPA Section 106 consultative process on October 30, 2018 regarding the limb pit remains discovered at MNBP in 2014/5

  • Discussed NPS primary focus protect the resources (ground/site) and tell the story (interpretation)

  • Reviewed NMHM paper summarizing the analysis of limbs/remains (11 amputated limbs and scattered bone fragments) discovered to date

  • Summarized the essence of the proposed MOA amendment
    o 10-year loan agreement (standard NPS practice) with NMHM of 7 amputated

    limbs deemed of medical value

o Remainder of limbs deemed of limited medical value and bone fragments

transfer to the Army for disposition
o Complete site excavation - assess and treat newly discovered limbs/remains

in similar manner

  • Reviewed substantive comments on proposed MOA amendment received by NPS

  • Introduced NMHM letter received on October 28, 2019

26


Army OGC representative, presented the Army’s views and concerns with proposed Moa Amendment

  • Noted this issue has attention of SES-level political appointees at HQDA

  • Important to balance the desire for research/education with the respectful

    treatment of remains

  • Questioned time frame of 10 years for research, study and analysis

  • Questioned how limbs might be used in interpretation (public displays)

    On November 26, 2019 NPS/MNBP provided a revised draft MOA amendment that incorporated revisions discussed during the October 31, 2019 consulting party meeting.

  • Feedback on the revised draft MOA amendment was due to NPS (MNBP) by December 18, 2019

  • Army postponed input submission until January 2020

  • BRCWRT input provided to MNBP on January 4, 2020 primarily recommended

    edits and revisions to Amendment wording for clarification and consistency. No

    major issues from BRCWRT’s perspective.

  • As of February 28, 2020, the Army has not responded, nor provided any comments or input

    on the revised draft MOA Amendment.

  • NPS/MNBP is in consultation with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

    (ACHP) regarding Army’s intransience and options to effectively proceed with he Section 106 process

    Federal Agencies involved:

  • National Park Service (NPS)

  • Department of the Army

  • Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP)

    Consulting Parties:

  • Virginia State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO)

  • Archaeological Society of Virginia

  • Bull Run Civil War Round Table

  • Manassas Battlefield Trust

  • National Museum of Health and Medicine

  • National Museum of Natural History

  • Prince William County Historic Preservation Division

  • Prince William County Historical Commission

  • Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

    Planned Actions/Activities:

The next Section 106 consulting party meeting is to be scheduled

27


Gainesville Crossing (Latsios Property)

Background.
This property, an approximately 200-
acre tract along Pageland Lane opposite Stuart’s Hill & MNBP HQ & Visitor Center, is located on the south side of Lee Hwy (Route 29) between its intersections with Heathcote Blvd/ I-66 Exit 43B off ramp and Pageland Lane.

Historical Significance - Battle of 2nd Manassas (Bull Run)

  • Action in opening stages of Brawner Farm engagement

  • Longstreet, Lee, Jackson 29 August 1862 meeting site marker later moved during

    Route 29 expansion/widening to current location

  • Texas Field Hospital site

  • Site of a monument to Timothy Dunklin, 4th Texas Infantry, killed at the Battle of

    Second Manassas; died at Texas field hospital site

    BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Minimize impact on Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP) and 2nd Manassas

    Battlefield
    o MNBP Viewshed
    o Vehicleparking
    o Traffic noise
    o Minimize building impacts

    Building(s) visibility (height, location, screening) External color scheme
    External lighting
    External signage

    External mechanical equipment

  • Include, as appropriate and as coordinated with the PWC Archaeologist, NOVA Relic

    Hunters as part of metal detecting to be conducted at Site 44 PW 1792, adjacent to

    the William H. Brown House, and the area described on Exhibit A.

  • Preserve and restore Dunklin Monument and site

  • Public access to, and historic marker for, Lee-Longstreet-Jackson meeting marker

    Status Summary:
    In August 2019 the developer submitted a rezoning request, #REZ2018-00008, Gainesville Crossing (Gainesville Magisterial District)
    - a request to rezone ±152.7 acres from A-1, Agricultural, to PBD, Planned Business District, to allow a mix of commercial uses, and a modification to allow for by-right data centers, an electric substation, and other uses in the PBD district. The application also includes waivers and modifications.

    On November 13, 2019 Blake Myers received an email from Prince William Conservation Alliance with information and a link to the PWC Planning Office Memorandum to the PWC Planning Commission containing the staff analysis of and recommendations concerning the rezoning request.

    On November 14, 2019 BRCWRT members (Mark Trbovich, Blake Myers, Kim Brace and John DePue) received via email a letter from Michael R. Vanderpool, Esq., attorney handling

28


the Gainesville Crossing rezoning request for the developer. This letter, dated November 8, 2019, indicated that the developer (and attorney) had been provided a copy of BRCWRT’s January 24, 2018 letter, and had been working diligently with the Superintendent of Manassas National Battlefield Park on the project and the proposed proffers.

The Proffer Statement, according to the letter received, was initiated on August 13, 2019, and updated on September 13, 2019; September 23, 2019; October 21, 2019; October 29, 2019 and November 8, 2019.

Summary of proposed proffers:

The Applicant has commissioned a preliminary KOCOA Study and has authorized a study of the initial artillery engagement that occurred near the intersection of Route 29 and Pageland Lane on the morning of August 28. Additionally, metal detecting will be conducted in an area identified by the County Archeologist. You may be aware of the fact that prior studies were performed on the property, including approximately 1,000 shovel digs. The additional research the Applicant is conducting will add to the knowledge resulting from those prior studies.

The proffers also provide for preservation along Route 29 (including the replanting of an area now occupied by an electric line) and along the eastern boundary of the property that abuts the right of way for the extension of the potential Bi-County Parkway. In addition, the Applicant is providing 300 additional trees to be planted at locations on the property or the Battlefield at locations, specified by the Battlefield Superintendent, that will supplement the viewshed protection. The potential locations of the plantings were informed by balloon tests, site inspections and studies. Those tests, inspections and studies also led to establishment of height limits for all structures to be built on the property.

The Applicant is also going to dedicate approximately 6 acres of land surrounding the Dunklin Monument to the American Battlefield Trust or to the County and is also contributing $25,000.00 for improvements in that area. That will be at the discretion of the National Park Service in conjunction with the Trust/County, but that could include the types of improvements you suggest in your letter. This area would be across from the Battlefield facility on Stuart's Hill and convenient to visitors.

Finally, and importantly, the change of land use to a data center will provide a very low impact use on the portion of the property east of University Boulevard. This use generates minimal traffic that would travel through the Battlefield. In addition to height limits for the buildings, the Applicant has also committed to architectural proffers and a unique proffer that would provide for variable coloration of roof top equipment screening.

Specific Proffers Relevant to BRCWRT Concerns:

The applicable archaeological sites are those identified as 44 PW 1792 and the area identified on Exhibit A hereto. Site 44 PW 1792, adjacent to the William H. Brown House, will be the subject of a Phase II study including metal detection and a review of the life of William H. Brown. The area described on Exhibit A will be subject to metal detecting and a report regarding the purported artillery incident on or near the property pursuant to the

29


scope of work prepared by the County Archaeologist as of September 23, 2019. The Applicant will curate in accordance with the recommendations of the reports. The reports and curation shall be in accordance with accepted standards, and the reports shall be prepared and submitted to the Director of Planning or his or her designee prior to submission of the first site plan.

Land Bay D shall be donated to the American Battlefield Trust or its designee with a restrictive covenant that it shall remain maintained in an undisturbed state except as provided below. If the American Battlefield Trust declines said donation, the Applicant shall donate the land bay D to the County, or its designee or, if they decline said donation, then the County. Said donation shall occur prior to the final site plan approval for Land Bay A The Applicant shall contribute $25,000.00 to the American Battlefield Trust or its designee within one year of final non-appealed zoning approval for plantings in or improvements to Land Bay D related to the Civil War, such as the relocation of an historical marker currently located in Conway Robinson State Forest, a Civil War Trail interpretive sign, and the repair of the Dunklin Monument.

On November 19, 2019 BRCWRT submitted a letter to PWC Planning Office with our concerns regarding the Rezoning Request#REZ2018-00008, Gainesville Crossing. Based on the attorney’s November 14, 2019 letter, the developer effectively addressed all BRCWRT

30


requests and concerns with the exception of the meeting marker and proposed historical site/kiosk at the pond.

On November 20, 2019 The PWC Planning Commission conducted a public hearing on Rezoning Request#REZ2018-00008, Gainesville Crossing. The Planning Commission voted 6-2 to approve, but with amendments related to the power supply. Although there was discussion about the impacts on the battlefield and viewshed, the primary concern was the power capacity issue, including citizen concerns with not repeating the Haymarket transmission line fiasco. Several Commissioners were concerned with the lack of data concerning electrical power capacity available to support the planned data centers, and the potential to have to either increase the capacity of the new transmission line, or to add another connection from the transmission line that runs along the western edge of MNBP.

The Planning Commission voted (6-2) to recommend approval of the Rezoning Request with two stipulations/amendments:

  • Confirmation from Dominion, certified by professional engineers, that the no additional power transmission will be required to service the proposed data centers

  • Inclusion of ‘hard data’ that indicates where the power for the proposed data centers is coming from, location of transmission lines that will service the proposed data centers, and the redundancy plan for sustaining electrical power in case of emergency(ies)

    On November 28, 2019 Blake Myers e-mailed Michael R. Vanderpool, Esq., attorney handling the Gainesville Crossing rezoning request for the developer, thanking him for his letter received via e-mail on November 14, 2019 and for working with the relevant parties to resolve the majority of our concerns with the proposed project. The e-mail also included a summary of BRCWRT concerns regarding the proposed plans for the Lee-Jackson- Longstreet Meeting Marker. Mr. Vanderpool response indicated the nonviability of relocating the marker south of Rt 29 due to insufficient space for a pedestrian trail and parking lot for public access.

    On December 10, 2019 the PWC Board of County Supervisors voted (7-1 [Frank Principi, Woodbridge]) to approve Rezoning Request#REZ2018-00008, Gainesville Crossing.

    BRCWRT members Blake Myers and Kim Brace met with MNBP Superintendent Brandon Bies and Chief of Interpretation Ray Brown on December 18, 2019 to discuss the Data Center Rezoning, the donated parcel containing the Dunklin Monument, the Lee-Jackson- Longstreet Meeting Marker and associated aspects of the property development, including information provided by Mike Vanderpool. Information discussed during this meeting included:

Donated parcel containing the Dunklin Monument
o ABT will accept the parcel donation, with ultimate plan to donate it to the

NPS as part of MNBP
o A Dunklin Family member contacted MNBP and indicated they have a deed

for the land parcel on which the Dunklin Monument is located 31


o Superintendent Bies asked if BRCWRT would be interested in following up with the Dunklin Family member regarding this deed. Blake Myers agreed to do so and requested that the family member’s contact information be provided to him (Blake) awaiting this information

  • VDOT Right of Way for Bi-County Parkway
    o If VDOT gives up the ROW, the first right of refusal is to the owner of the

    ‘Latsios property’
    o The developers proffer surrenders this first right of refusal to the owner of

    the preserved (donated) parcel

  • PWC Trail along US Route 29

    o PWC Comprehensive Plan includes a multi-modal trail on eh north side of Rt 29

o County wants to tie this trail into NPS trail near Brawner Farm NPS is opposed to this as NPS does not allow bikes on trails within its parks

o This trail could conceivably provide parking and access to the current location of the Lee-Jackson-Longstreet Meeting Marker

Interpretive Marker on Artillery action during early phases of 2nd Battle of Manassas o Location is intended to be in the donated (preserved) parcel adjacent to the

intersection of Rt 29 and Pageland Lane

Parties Involved.
Prince William County Planning Office
Prince William County Historical Commission
National Park Service / Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP) Manassas Battlefield Trust (MBT)
BRCWRT
Prince William Conservation Alliance

Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Maintain contact and coordination with PWC Planning Office, MNBP, and PW

    Conservation Alliance

  • Coordinate with PWC Archaeologist for incorporating NOVA Relic Hunters in site

    metal detecting as part of Archaeologist study

  • Coordinate with MNBP in restoration and preservation of Dunklin monument

  • Monitor developments regarding Lee-Longstreet- Jackson meeting marker and trail

    on north side of Rt 29

32


Bristoe Station and Kettle Run Battlefields Preservation Study Comprehensive Plan Update

Background:
On June 18, 2019 the Bristoe Station Preservation Study Comprehensive Plan Amendment (CPA2018-00002) hearing scheduled for the Board of Supervisors meeting was deferred to September 3, 2019. The deferral, requested by Supervisor Lawson (Brentsville District), was based on a letter submitted by the Northern Virginia Building Industry Association (NVBIA) requesting that the Board of Supervisors reject the CPA2018-00002 and handle the issue through the Rural Area Preservation Study Implementation (CPA2018-00009).

The two preservation studies (Bristoe Station and Kettle Run Battlefields Preservation Study, Rural Area Preservation Study) have completely different purposes and focus, and no direct inter-relationship. BRCWRT’s Preservation Committee is continuing to work with the Prince William County Planning Office and the Prince William County Historical Commission in sustaining support for the Board of Supervisors to adopt CPA2018-00002. CPA2018-00002 can be reviewed and comments submitted at the link: http://www.pwcgov.org/government/dept/planning/Pages/Comprehensive-Plan- Update.aspx

BRCWRT Objective: Adoption of Bristoe Station Preservation Study Comprehensive Plan Amendment CPA 2018-0002

Status Summary:
Revisions to the Prince William County Comprehensive Plan based on recommendations from the Rural Area Study update (CPA2018-00009) will have no direct impact on the recommendations being considered in CPA2018-00002. According to PWC Planning Office personnel, the Rural Area Study Update and CPA2018-00008 will not be completed and considered by the Planning Commission until 2020 (dates/timeline to be determined). A Planning Commission Rural Area Study Working Session is scheduled for October 23, 2019, followed by a Planning Commission Hearing that is yet to be scheduled.

The Board of Supervisors consideration of CPA2018-0002 has been deferred beyond September 3 to date to be determined. In its June 2019 decision to defer consideration and discussion until the September 3 meeting, the Board of Supervisors directed the PWC Planning Office to meet with affected landowners to gain a better understanding of their concerns with the draft CPA and to recommend any appropriate adjustments. As of January 2020, that meeting has not occurred.

Justin Patton, PWC Archaeologist, met with the property owner concerned, Mrs. Parker, on February 13, 2020 to discuss relevant issues/concerns with CPA2018-0002. No specific issues were identified; however, Mrs. Parker is in the process of marketing her property in hopes of selling it in the near term and will be concerned with any CPA provision that would potentially impact the value of her land. The next step is for the Planning Office to document this meeting and discussion, then re-engage the PWC Board of County Supervisors on the CPA and the results of the meeting with the concerned landowner. The timeframe for these actions is ‘to be determined’ but is anticipated for May 2020.

33


Parties Involved:
PWC Planning Commission
PWC Board of County Supervisors PWC Historical Commission BRCWRT

Planned Actions/Activities:

  • As appropriate, schedule and conduct a follow up meeting with Supervisor Lawson

  • Attend and speak in favor of the CPA during public hearing(s) scheduled by PWC

    Board of Supervisors

    Mt Zion Battlefield & Mt. Zion Historic Park

    Background:
    Located immediately to your left and across Route 50 from Gilbert's Corner, the Mt. Zion Old School Baptist Church was built in 1851. The church was a place of worship for Old School Baptists until 1980 and served various purposes during the Civil War, including a
    rendezvous point for Mosby’s Rangers, a hospital and prison, and a battleground. The adjacent cemetery contains more than 240 marked headstones, and a War of 1812 veteran. The battle of Mt. Zion on July 6, 1864 pitted Union forces against the famed Mosby and his Rangers who won the day.

    In February 2020 a developer submitted a proposed site plan for the private property adjacent to historic Mt. Zion Church to Loudoun County. As currently zoned, there are no restrictions on the by right development for this property.

    Threatened Site: Mt. Zion Battlefield

    BRCWRT Objective: Preserve Mt. Zion Battlefield, or at a minimum mitigate the impact of development on the historic battlefield

    Status Summary:
    Several organizations and a number of concerned citizens, led by the Ohana Preservation Association (an equestrian organization) and the Mosby Heritage Area Association (MHAA), have organized and are working to diffuse and/or mitigate the imminent threat to this historic land. Current plans of this group include:

• •

Letters to be sent to Loudoun County and the County Engineer, expressing a general concern that a development would destroy this important historic resource

Launch of a website to spread awareness about the importance of preserving the battlefield (~230 acres), stressing that it also contributes to the Mt. Zion Church experience and rural gateway viewshed. The website will collect sympathetic "signatures" (name/email).

Nominating the battlefield for addition to Preservation Virginia's and American Battlefield Trust's most endangered historic places/battlefield list.

34

Writing a news article intended for release to Loudoun Now and local newspapers about the issue. Emphasizing MHAA's Aldie Triangle to emphasize that this historic resource is already an important and treasured element in student education. MHAA is planning one of its history video clips at the Battlefield for use on Facebook.

Initial discussions with a potential "Angel Investor" who is very interested in


purchasing the property.
The effort is focused on creating sufficient public outcry that the developer sees a headache coming and turns his energy elsewhere.

Parties Involved:

  • Ohana Preservation Foundation

  • Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority (NOVA Parks)

  • Mosby Heritage Area Association (MHAA)

  • Piedmont Environmental Council (PEC)

  • American Historical Association (AHA)

  • BRCWRT

    Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Maintain contact and coordination with NOVA Parks, Ohana Preservation

    Foundation and MHAA

  • Publish news article, once approved & released, in BRCWRT’s Stone Wall newsletter

  • Monitor developments

35

 Long-Term Preservation Initiatives:

Military Railroad Park, Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA)

Background:
Located at 6850 Colonel Taylor Lane (Centreville), the Military Railroad Park (44FX1770) in Centreville includes a Fairfax County Historical Marker on Compton Road and remnants of the bed of the Confederate Military Rail Road (CMRR) that parallels and extends beyond Colonel Taylor Lane and continues to parallel to (and to the rear of HOA homes on) Meeting Camp Road . This FCPA Park is not being effectively monitored or maintained, has become overgrown, encroached upon by HOA residents adjacent to the park, and is virtually non- accessible.

BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Properly preserve, interpret and protect extant CMRR bed remnants

  • Develop and implement a Military Railroad Park Preservation and Interpretation

    Plan
    o Site Management Plan
    o Site Preservation and Interpretation Plan

    Status Summary:
    What was once a well-maintained, albeit small, park area has atrophied due to neglect and is no longer readily accessible or viewable.

    Parties Involved: FCPA
    BRCWRT

    Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Address the status and condition of the park with FCPA

  • Confirm whether FCPA currently has, and is implementing a Preservation and

    Interpretation Plan for the park

  • In conjunction with FCPA, develop (as necessary) a plan to preserve, interpret and

    maintain park and the extant Historical Marker to ensure meaningful public access and visitation

    Confederate Fortifications Historic Site (formerly Union Mills Historic Site)

    Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA)

    Background.
    Located off of Balmoral Avenue between Centreville and Clifton, the Confederate Fortifications Site includes two fenced-in areas
    the A-Fort fortification [44FX506] and the Battery Hill/Great Redoubt fortification. Both sites have been studied and examined, and in January 2005 the Fairfax County Park Authority Board approved the General Management Plan for the site. Subsequently FCPA contracted with John Milner Associates, Inc. for development of a site treatment plan. This plan, the Confederate Fortifications Site

36


Treatment Plan, was delivered to the FCPA in May 2006. Due to concerns raised by some residents living near the site, none of the elements (archaeological assessments, parking area, interpretive trails, markers, etc.) of the General Management Plan or Treatment Plan have ever been implemented. The two areas were each enclosed by a chain-link fence, with a locked gate, and left alone. The Fairfax County Historical Marker that was installed along Balmoral Avenue is no longer visible from the roadway due to the growth of trees around it.

BRCWRT Objectives:

  • Properly preserve, interpret and protect extant fortifications and campsite

    remnants

  • Implement the approved General Management Plan and Treatment Plan,

    establishing a publicly accessible historic site
    o Site Preservation and Interpretation Plan

  • Develop and implement a Site Management Plan

    Status Summary:
    What was once on track to be a preserved and interpreted historical park has atrophied due
    local homeowners’ opposition to the park and FCPA neglect. Large trees felled by storms threaten the earthworks and in several cases have significantly damaged the chain- link fence installed to protect, by deterring access, the two areas.

    Parties Involved: FCPA
    BRCWRT

    Planned Actions/Activities.

  • Address the status and condition of the site with FCPA

  • Confirm whether FCPA current has, and is implementing, maintenance and

    monitoring plan(s) for the site

  • In conjunction with FCPA, develop (as necessary) a plan to implement the approved

    General Management Plan and Treatment Plan, establishing a publicly accessible historic site

37


Sites and Projects Being Monitored

Liberia Road Development

Background:
Property on the northeast corner of Liberia Ave and Prince William Parkway is in the process of a two-phased development. The northern part of the property is being developed (construction), and the southern portion (next to the Parkway) is in the development plan approval process. This property includes the site of a camp for Alabama (and possibly North Carolina) confederate troops during 1861.

Status Summary:
In May 2018 Kim went before the PWC Planning Commission and proposed that the developer install a historic marker and set aside a small area of the planned parking lot for the creation of a "History Plaza", similar to what was installed in Gettysburg at the site of Camp Letterman. The attorney representing the developer at this meeting told the Commission that he talked with his client that evening and he agreed to install historical signage.

Kim Brace, Preservation Committee member and Chairman, PWC Historical Commission, was informed by the developer in June 2018 that the development will include an historical plaza with two historical markers (details to be determined).

Featherbed Lane (Manassas National Battlefield Park)

Background. During 2016 a traffic and engineering study was conducted for Featherbed Lane roadway improvement options. The Prince William County Department of Transportation (PWC DOT) conducted a Community Work Group Meeting on October 25, 2016 to gather public opinions on the options presented in the roadway study. The meeting included an overview of the study’s findings and results and collection of community input and feedback on potential roadway improvement options.

Featherbed Lane, an unpaved road with limited two-way traffic, is the sole unimproved roadway remaining within Manassas National Battlefield Park (MNBP) and traverses key terrain of the 2nd Manassas Battlefield. Key preservation concerns include the impact of improvement options under consideration (paving and straightening the roadway) on the historic character of Featherbed Lane within MNBP, leading to increased use by commuters as an alternative to Route 234.

The National Park Service (NPS) is a primary property owner of Featherbed Lane and land adjacent to Featherbed Lane, with VDOT holding a 30-foot wide prescriptive easement. The majority of the property on both sides of the roadway is included in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Manassas National Battlefield.

The NPS’s primary concerns focus on preserving the roadway setting, which includes dense tree cover, as well as the safety of the public at the three existing MNBP trail crossings of Featherbed Lane, particularly the crossing at General Trimbles Lane. NPS is open to minor

38


roadway improvements, including minor construction to fix drainage problems, provided the improvements can be completed without significant impacts to existing tree canopy or encroachment beyond the 30-foot prescriptive roadway easement.

Status Summary:
VDOT has funds and wants to pave Featherbed Lane up to the intersection with General Trimbles Lane. Local homeowners initially supported paving contingent on including traffic calming measures
current traffic count/use data does not qualify for traffic calming measures. Homeowners do not support paving without traffic calming measures. NPS/MNBP is ok with paving, but notes that paving will lead to increased traffic and increased vehicular speed - requiring a four way stop (traffic calming measure) at intersectionofFeatherbedLaneandGeneralTrimblesLane. NPS/MNBPdoesnotsupport reducing the embankment at the intersection (a section of unfinished railroad [Manassas Gap Railroad] along General Trimbles Lane) to enhance sight lines / visibility at intersection.

Project is on hold (a/o 21 November 2017)

General Longstreet Line Neighborhood (Zuave Hills) (Manassas National

Battlefield Park)

Potential for development as homeowners seek to sell property (north side of Groveton Road)

Park Ridge Business Mall (Manassas National Battlefield Park)

(Bulloch Drive - off of Business 234; borders MNBP & Chinn Ridge)
Potential to be sold or to go out of business (several buildings are empty) - future use & potential impact on MNBP

Pageland Lane (Manassas National Battlefield Park)

Property owners exploring development opportunities (Snyder farm and two others)

Broad Run Golf Academy (Bristoe Station Battlefield)

Background. This property is well within the core Bristoe Station Battlefield and contains some winter hut sites. Much of this property is classified as wetlands.

Current Status. The Golf Academy property has recently been sold to a commercial interest that may seek tract rezoning; however, as of November 2017, no rezoning request or application has been filed with Prince William County (PWC).

39


Brown’s Battery Site (Bristoe Station Battlefield)

Background. In December 2016 the proposal to extend the Virginia Railway Express (VRE) line to Haymarket was abandoned. However, VRE is in the process of implementing approved plans for expanding the has announced plans to existing VRE Broad Run Station, including the storage track to accommodate the addition of 10 new passenger cars to the Broad Run-based fleet, constructing an expanded employee welfare building, increasing parking capacity, adding a third main track from the Broad Run Station to Wellington Road, and shifting the station platform to the east to accommodate the yard expansion and adding a pedestrian tunnel that will go under the rail tracks to the parking area.

Current Status. The project as described in VRE’s June 28, 2019 letter and north of the present VRE station does not encroach on the presumed Brown’s Battery site.

BRCWRT Objective: Incorporate Browns Battery site into Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park

Manassas Assembly of God Property (Bristoe Station Battlefield)

Background. The subject church-owned property includes the terrain over which Brig. Gen. William Kirkland's North Carolina Brigade advanced toward the railroad cut occupied by Union forces during the Battle of Bristoe Station. The Church and its pastor have, from time-to-time, proposed to develop the tract for various purposes including that of a for- profit cemetery. The southern half of this property is currently zoned M-2 (light Industrial); the entire property is shown as Flexible Employment Center on the Comprehensive Plan.

The Civil War Trust (CWT) has attempted to purchase the entirety of the tract of approximately 130 acres (or a significant portion thereof), but to date has been unsuccessful. This property is crucial to preserving the core Bristoe Station Battlefield.

Hylton Property (Bristoe Station Battlefield)

The southeast quadrant of the Bristoe Station Battlefield, incorporating portions of the Union defensive lines and the site of Arnold's battery is owned by Hylton Enterprises, a large-scale home developer in Prince William County (PWC). To date, we are not aware of any action(s) by Hylton to develop this tract.

Cockpit Point (Possum Point Battery Sites)
The incorporation of the Cockpit Point Battlefield Study and Battlefield Management Plan into Prince William County’s Comprehensive Plan offers potential funding for implementing study recommendations.

40


Eagles Point East Development (Civil War Fortifications)

Background.
Earthworks and a small artillery redoubt (44PW1229) are located along and on the ridge behind the Police HQ building across the parking lot from the A.J. Ferlazzo [PWC Government] Building at 15941 Donald Curtis Drive in Woodbridge.

The Eagles Point East housing development is on the top and south slope of the ridge, bordering US Rte 1. The artillery redoubt is fenced off in a protected area. The two lines of earthworks on the north slope of the ridge are not directly threatened by the development.

Submitted by the BRCWRT Preservation Committee:

Blake Myers (Chair) John Depue
Kim Brace
Rob Orrison

John Pearson Jim Lewis John Browne Dave Huxsoll

Cc: Bull Run Civil War Round Table Executive Committee Members

41